People

Faculty

Patricia A. Banks

Professor of Sociology; Chair of Sociology and Anthropology

Patricia A. Banks studies culture, consumption, and markets with a focus on race and ethnicity. In 2019 Banks was in residence at Stanford University as a CASBS Fellow. She is author of the books Diversity and Philanthropy at African American Museums (Routledge 2019) and Represent: Art and Identity Among the Black Upper-Middle Class (Routledge 2010). In other projects Banks is investigating corporate support for the arts and the market for art from the African Diaspora. She is also completing Race, Ethnicity, and Consumption: A Sociological View (Under Contract Routledge) where she brings sociological theory to bear on race and ethnicity in the marketplace.

Patricia A. Banks

Meredith Coleman-Tobias

Assistant Professor of Religion; on leave Spring 2022

Coleman-Tobias' research interests consider Caribbean and North American iterations of African Atlantic religious migrations. She brings to her research a background in community theater, and interrogations of performance, place-making and knowledge reproduction significantly inform her understanding of religious communities.

Photo of Meredith Coleman-Tobias

Amber Douglas

Professor of Psychology and Education; Dean of Studies; Director of Student Success Initiatives

Amber Douglas is a licensed clinical psychologist. She teaches courses related to psychological distress, mental health, trauma, resilience and research methods. Her work lies at the intersection of social psychology and clinical psychology, specifically the interactions between social contexts and individual differences. She examines the impact of traumatic stress on cognitive processes, interpersonal health, and mental health in her work. In addition, Douglas investigates how race and other aspects of identity intersect with one’s appraisal and experience of stress, trauma and psychological well-being. Most recently, her work examines the role of psychological distress and resilience in academic contexts.

Photo of Amber Douglas

Satyananda J. Gabriel

Professor of Economics

Satyananda Gabriel's dedication to improving the world is visible not only in his commitment to education but also through his numerous community development projects, which have included positions with the Urban League of Portland, Oregon; the First Nations Development Institute; and the United Nations Development Program. Gabriel is currently involved in the Rural Development Leadership Network, which is designed to train rural professionals to be more effective leaders.

Satyananda J. Gabriel

Samba Gadjigo

Helen Day Gould Professor of French

Samba Gadjigo's research focuses on French-speaking Africa, particularly the work of filmmaker Ousmane Sembene. In 2001, Gadjigo was instrumental in bringing the Senegalese filmmaker to MHC for screenings and discussions of his work.

Samba Gadijo

Dorothy E. Mosby

Interim Dean of Faculty and Vice President for Academic Affairs; Mary E. Woolley Professor of Spanish

Dorothy E. Mosby is the chief academic officer at Mount Holyoke College. She is responsible for providing strategic and operational leadership for the College’s academic mission and for supporting the 35 academic departments and programs; Library, Information, and Technology Services; academic centers; and the academic support offices, including the Office of the Registrar, the Office of Student Success and Advising, and the Teaching and Learning Initiative.

Dorothy Mosby

Olabode Festus Omojola

Hammond-Douglass Five College Professor of Music

Olabode Omojola teaches ethnomusicology, with special interests in the music of African and African Diaspora communities. As an ethnomusicologist, Omojola’s research employs ethnographic fieldwork methods in the process of understanding how music is conceptualized, practiced and interpreted within their cultural contexts; the relationships between music and social life; the roles of individual musicians and groups as culture producers; and how musical traditions reflect and respond to changes within a society, including those occasioned by global forces.

Olabode Festus Omojola in front of a tree in spring

Preston H. Smith II

Class of 1926 Professor of Politics

Preston H. Smith II regularly teaches courses on Urban Policy, Black Migrations, Black Metropolis, and American Politics. He received a Whiting fellowship to study race and social housing in the Netherlands. His research interests include class and African-American politics, neoliberalism, and urban policy, and affordable housing policy. He is the author of Racial Democracy and the Black Metropolis: Housing Policy in Postwar Chicago as well as numerous articles and book chapters.

Preston H. Smith II

Lucas Wilson

Professor of Africana Studies and Economics; Chair of Economics

Lucas Wilson focuses much of his work on the philosophy and methodology of economics, Marxism, the political economy of race, and exploring the various economic and noneconomic conditions that restrict opportunities and inhibit social progress for African-Americans.

Lucas Wilson

Staff

Holly J. Sharac

Academic Department Coordinator

Holly Sharac is a Francis Perkins graduate ('94), has been working at the College since 1988, and is the Academic Department Coordinator for both the History Department and the Africana Studies Program.

Holly J. Sharac