News

A false-color topographic map (blue marks low elevations) shows the area around Mars's Jezero Crater, which was home to an ancient lake system. Photo by NASA/MSSS/ASU/GSFC
NASA may send the next Mars rover to the Jezero Crater, identified in 2005 by Mount Holyoke planetary scientist Caleb Fassett as having once been an ancien
Darby Dyar, blond white woman in blue sweater seated at desk with three computer monitors and charts on the wall.
Mount Holyoke’s Darby Dyar talked to The Wall Street Journal about the recent discovery of phosphine gas in Venus’s atmosphere.
This is a photograph of the asteroid Bennu. Image courtesy of NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona
NASA has taken a sample from an asteroid more than 200 million miles away. Mount Holyoke’s Thomas Burbine explained why that’s important.
This is photo of astronomy professor Darby Dyar in her lab. She is smiling, holds a tray of samples, standing in front of shelves with numbered trays stacked on them.
Astronomy professor Darby Dyar uses real-world tricorders and a growing database of spectroscopic minerals signatures to identify minerals found in space.