People

Faculty

Kate Singer

Associate Professor of English; Chair of Critical Social Thought
Kate Singer

Nigel Alderman

Associate Professor of English; on leave spring 2021
 Nigel Alderman

Kimberly Juanita Brown

Elizabeth C. Small Associate Professor of English and Africana Studies; on leave 2020-2021

Kimberly Juanita Brown's research engages the site of the visual as a way to negotiate the parameters of race, gender, and belonging.  Her book, The Repeating Body: Slavery’s Visual Resonance in the Contemporary (Duke University Press) examines slavery’s profound ocular construction and the presence and absence of seeing in relation to the plantation space and the women who exist there. She is currently at work on her second book, tentatively titled “Their Dead Among Us: Photography, Melancholy, and the Politics of the Visual.”  This project examines images of the dead in The New York Times in 1994 from four geographies: South Africa, Rwanda, Sudan, and Haiti. 

Kimberly Juanita Brown, Elizabeth C. Small Associate Professor of English and Africana Studies; Chair of Gender Studies

W. Donald Cotter

Associate Professor of Chemistry

Donnie Cotter's scientific research focuses on the mechanism of transmetalation. Recently, he has turned his scholarly attentions to the study the history of chemistry, focusing on the American chemical community between 1890 and 1920. Cotter is the author of numerous scholarly papers and presentations, many of them coauthored by Mount Holyoke students.

W. Donald Cotter

Justin Crumbaugh

Associate Professor of Spanish, Latina/o and Latin American Studies; on leave 2020-2021

Professor Crumbaugh’s research focuses on contemporary Spain. He is the author of Destination Dictatorship: The Spectacle of Spain’s Tourist Boom and the Reinvention of Difference (SUNY Press 2009) and co-author of Spanish Fascist Writing (U of Toronto Press forthcoming). Professor Crumbaugh’s articles have appeared in the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, the Hispanic Review, the Hispanic Research Journal, the Revista de Estudios Hispánicos, and other scholarly venues. His publications include studies on the cultural formations surrounding the Franco dictatorship, tourism, terrorism, and political victimhood.

Photo of Justin Crumbaugh

Iyko Day

Associate Professor of English; on leave 2020-2021

Iyko Day's research and teaching focus on race, capitalism, settler colonialism and Asian American literature and visual culture. She is the author of Alien Capital: Asian Racialization and the Logic of Settler Colonial Capitalism (Duke University Press, 2016).

Iyko Day

David Hernández

Associate Professor of Latina/o Studies

David Hernández is Associate Professor of Latina/o Studies at Mount Holyoke College. His research focuses on immigration enforcement, in particular, the U.S. detention regime. He is completing a book manuscript on this institution, titled "Alien Incarcerations: Immigrant Detention and Lesser Citizenship," and he is also the co-editor of Critical Ethnic Studies: A Reader (Duke University Press 2016). His work has appeared journals such as Border-Lines, Harvard Journal of Hispanic Policy, Journal of Race and Policy, Latina/o Studies, and NACLA: Report on the Americas.

David Hernández

Ren-yo Hwang

Assistant Professor of Gender Studies and Critical Social Thought; on leave 2020-2021

Ren-yo Hwang’s interdisciplinary teaching and research include courses and scholarship in queer- and transgender-of-color critique, feminist-of-color anti-violence initiatives and genealogies, abolition, transformative justice and community accountability. Hwang's current scholarship examines carceral technologies of control and punishment, antiviolence reform-based state partnerships of the late 20th century, and discourses concerning the identification of violence.

Ren-yo Hwang, Assistant Professor of Gender Studies

Amy E. Martin

Director of the Weissman Center for Leadership; Professor of English on the Emma B. Kennedy Foundation
Amy E. Martin

Karen Remmler

Mary Lyon Professor of Humanities; Chair of German Studies and Jewish Studies

Karen Remmler’s interdisciplinary research and teaching in English and German focuses on the politics and cultures of memory in the aftermath of atrocity and war in European and transnational contexts; German literature, film, and sites of memory within transnational contexts; 19th century critical social thought through the lens of contemporary social critics; and the interrelationship between national processes of transitional justice and the work of memory in films by the descendants of genocide survivors and perpetrators in non-western contexts.

Karen Remmler

Vanessa Rosa

Class of 1929 Dr. Virginia Apgar Assistant Professor of Latina/o Studies; on leave fall 2020

Vanessa Rosa is an assistant professor of Latina/o Studies. Her research interests include the study of race and ethnicity, citizenship and national identities, and social stratification in cities. Rosa is currently completing a book manuscript titled Diversifying Cities: Between Gentrification and Revitalization which investigates the national-identity making effects of the urban revitalization of two public housing projects in Toronto, Ontario. Rosa teaches courses on housing, cities, and Latina feminism and incorporates community-based learning and civic engagement in her teaching, including projects with various local organizations in Holyoke and Springfield.

Vanessa Rosa, Assistant Professor of Latina/o Studies

Matthew C. Watson

Assistant Professor of Anthropology

Matthew C. Watson works at the nexus of the anthropology of science and the history of anthropology. His publications have explored the artistic, spiritual, and scientific bases of Maya hieroglyphic decipherment. This research raises questions concerning spirits and cosmology, language ideology, secularism, empire, the politics of science, and ethnographic form. Watson teaches courses on anthropological theory, linguistic anthropology, science studies, the anthropology of religion, and ethnographic writing.

Lucas Wilson

Professor of Africana Studies and Economics; Chair of Economics

Lucas Wilson focuses much of his work on the philosophy and methodology of economics, Marxism, the political economy of race, and exploring the various economic and noneconomic conditions that restrict opportunities and inhibit social progress for African-Americans.

Lucas Wilson

Affiliated Faculty

Ali Aslam

Assistant Professor of Politics

Ali Aslam is a political theorist whose research and teaching examine how citizens negotiate key concepts like freedom, recognition, and democracy through political struggle.  He is author of Ordinary Democracy: Sovereignty and Citizenship Beyond the Neoliberal Impasse (2017) and has published articles on social movements, including Black Lives Matter and Occupy.  He teaches courses on grassroots democracy, political economy, democratic theory and practice, and the history of political thought.

Photo of Ali Aslam

Robin Blaetz

Emily Dickinson Professor of Film Studies; Chair of Film Media Theater

Robin Blaetz teaches Introduction to Film, History of World Cinema, Film Theory, and Experimental Film, as well as courses in various genres, including the Musical and Documentary. Her scholarly work centers on women and film; she has published an anthology called Women’s Experimental Cinema: Critical Frameworks (Duke University Press, 2007) and Visions of the Maid: Joan of Arc in American Film and Culture (Virginia University Press, 2001). Her current project explores the connections between the films of Joseph Cornell and his better known boxes.

Professor Robin Blaetz in the Williston Library reading room

Meredith Coleman-Tobias

Assistant Professor of Religion; on leave fall 2020

Coleman-Tobias' research interests consider Caribbean and North American iterations of African Atlantic religious migrations. She brings to her research a background in community theater, and interrogations of performance, place-making and knowledge reproduction significantly inform her understanding of religious communities.

Photo of Meredith Coleman-Tobias

Michael T. Davis

Professor of Art History; Chair of Architectural Studies

Michael Davis teaches courses on the art of the Middle Ages, the arts of Islam, and modern architecture. His research centers on French Gothic architecture including Notre-Dame, Paris and the cathedrals of Clermont-Ferrand and Limoges. Recently, he has been reconstructing lost buildings in medieval Paris (early video). Used in his seminars on Paris, these projects actively engage students in the evaluation of evidence, medieval design techniques, and the use of digital media.

Michael T. Davis Chair of Architectural Studies, Professor of Art History

Amber Douglas

Associate Professor of Psychology and Education; Dean of Studies; Director of Student Success Initiatives

Amber Douglas is a licensed clinical psychologist. She teaches courses related to psychological distress, mental health, trauma, resilience and research methods. Her work lies at the intersection of social psychology and clinical psychology, specifically the interactions between social contexts and individual differences. She examines the impact of traumatic stress on cognitive processes, interpersonal health, and mental health in her work. In addition, Douglas investigates how race and other aspects of identity intersect with one’s appraisal and experience of stress, trauma and psychological well-being. Most recently, her work examines the role of psychological distress and resilience in academic contexts.

Photo of Amber Douglas

Satyananda J. Gabriel

Professor of Economics; on leave fall 2020

Satyananda Gabriel's dedication to improving the world is visible not only in his commitment to education but also through his numerous community development projects, which have included positions with the Urban League of Portland, Oregon; the First Nations Development Institute; and the United Nations Development Program. Gabriel is currently involved in the Rural Development Leadership Network, which is designed to train rural professionals to be more effective leaders.

Satyananda J. Gabriel

Lowell Gudmundson

Professor of Latin American Studies and History; on leave fall 2020

Lowell Gudmundson focuses on coffee, Central America, and Afro-Latin America.  His students have earned graduate and professional degrees in the U.S., Latin America, and Europe.  They have turned their own research interests, as diverse as history, immigration, ethnomusicology, health care, and food studies, into career paths in politics, publishing, medicine, public health, urban planning or ecotourism.  Gudmundson maintains close ties and joint research projects with Costa Rica’s public universities where he began his career.

 Lowell Gudmundson Professor of Latin American Studies and History, on leave Spring 2016

Christian Gundermann

Associate Professor of Gender Studies

Christian Gundermann understands theory as a daily practice like breathing and eating. He teaches students in different contexts as diverse as the interpretation of films, the history of the queer movement, the questioning of the human/animal boundary, the historical study of horsemanship, the practice of body modifications, the connections between feminism and the sciences, the nexuses of power, knowledge, pleasure, and suffering etc. that there is no practice without theory, and that every theory is always already a practice.

James Hartley

Professor of Economics; on leave 2020-2021

James E. Hartley is Professor of Economics and teaches Macroeconomic Theory, Money and Banking, and Principles of Economics among other economics courses.  Outside of the Economics Department, he has also taught multiple courses using the Great Books, including “Western Civilization: An Introduction Through the Great Books,” “Leadership and the Liberal Arts,” “Is Business Moral?” (developed with a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities), and numerous tutorials and reading groups on the Western Canon. 

James Hartley

Jacquelyne Luce

Lecturer in Gender Studies

Jacquelyne Luce’s teaching and research explore the interconnected worlds of activism, research, and care that contribute to the development, use and governance of emerging medical technologies, especially within the fields of assisted reproduction and genetics/genomics. She is the author of Beyond Expectation: Lesbian/Bi/Queer Women and Assisted Conception (University of Toronto Press, 2010). She teaches courses on feminist health politics, reproductive and genetic technologies, transnational medical mobilities, and feminist technoscience governance. She is currently exploring emerging transnational rare disease knowledge cultures and the ‘participatory knowledge politics’ of governing mitochondrial replacement techniques.

Photo of Jacquelyne Luce

Elizabeth K. Markovits

Associate Dean of Faculty; Professor of Politics; Director of the Teaching and Learning Initiative

Elizabeth Markovits teaches courses in political theory, ranging from ancient Greek thought to contemporary feminist and democratic theory. She is the author of Future Freedoms: Intergenerational Justice, Democratic Theory, and Ancient Greek Tragedy & Comedy (2018) and The Politics of Sincerity: Plato, Frank Speech, and Democratic Judgment (2008). She has published academic articles on rhetoric and politics, on Greek comedy and tragedy, and on women, carework, and democracy in the contemporary United States, as well as numerous op-eds. 

Elizabeth K. Markovits, Professor of Politics; Director of First-Year Seminars; Director of the Teaching and Learning Initiative

Mary Renda

Professor of History

A historian who continually pushes the boundaries of her discipline, Mary Renda focuses her teaching and research on US empire, women and gender, racism, activism, and the transnational contexts in which histories of North America and the Caribbean have taken shape. In addition to her course offerings on U.S. women's history, African-American women, and histories of empire, Renda teaches interdisciplinary gender studies courses. It's not a vacation from her area of specialty, however. "When I teach gender studies," says Renda, "it brings into sharper relief the importance of history."

Mary Renda

Lauret Savoy

David B. Truman Professor of Environmental Studies; on leave 2020-2021

A writer, teacher, photographer, and pilot, Lauret Savoy is also a woman of multiracial heritage. Her courses and writings explore the narratives we tell of the American land’s origins — and the narratives we tell of ourselves in this land, including the place of race. Winner of Mount Holyoke College’s Distinguished Teaching Award and an Andrew Carnegie Fellowship, Lauret has also held fellowships from the Smithsonian Institution and Yale University. She is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America. Senior classes have chosen her to be a Baccalaureate speaker and Last Lecturer.

Lauret Savoy, David B. Truman Professor of Environmental Studies; Co-Chair of Environmental Studies

Preston H. Smith II

Class of 1926 Professor of Politics; on leave spring 2021

Preston H. Smith II regularly teaches courses on Urban Policy, Black Migrations, Black Metropolis, and American Politics. He received a Whiting fellowship to study race and social housing in the Netherlands. His research interests include class and African-American politics, neoliberalism, and urban policy, and affordable housing policy. He is the author of Racial Democracy and the Black Metropolis: Housing Policy in Postwar Chicago as well as numerous articles and book chapters.

Preston H. Smith II

Kenneth H. Tucker, Jr.

Helen P. Bibbero Professor of Sociology; on leave fall 2020

Kenneth Tucker’s teaching and research interests include sociological theory, historical sociology, social movements, social inequality, and contemporary media.  He is the author of five books, most recently Workers of the World Enjoy! (2010), and many articles, including The Political is Personal, Expressive, Aesthetic, and Networked: Contemporary American Languages of the Self from Trump to Black Lives Matter (2017).  His current research focuses on the creation of a distinctive upper class culture in late nineteenth century New England and an exploration of the rise and cultural significance of contemporary populism, in particular the appeal of Donald Trump.

Kenneth H. Tucker

Staff

Sue Rusiecki

Academic Department Coordinator