People

Faculty

Valerie Barr

Jean E. Sammet Professor of Computer Science; Chair of Computer Science

While actively pursuing the application of software testing to artificial intelligence systems, Valerie Barr promotes the interdisciplinary application of computing through a combination of changes to computer science curricula and courses, as well as research and course collaborations with faculty from the full range of disciplines within the liberal arts. She is very active in the computer science education community and has led significant diversity efforts for the Association for Computing Machinery.

Valerie Barr

Dylan Shepardson

Associate Professor of Mathematics

Dylan Shepardson works on mathematical problems that are motivated by applications in other disciplines, like biology, epidemiology, sociology, or archaeology. He is especially interested in new and unusual applications of optimization theory. In most physical, biological, and economic systems, a property is being optimized (like energy or entropy in physical systems, or reproductive success in evolutionary biology), and optimization techniques offer interesting insights into these systems. Shepardson's recent projects include voting theory and its connections to combinatorial geometry, infectious disease modeling, and the problem of using collections of radiocarbon data to estimate dates of the earliest human settlements of Pacific islands.

Dylan Shepardson

Maria Alexandra Gomez

Elizabeth Page Greenawalt Professor of Chemistry

Maria Gomez and her student researchers use the principles of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and quantum mechanics to study how structure affects proton and oxygen vacancy conduction in fuel cell systems. Their work has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the MERCURY consortium, the Dreyfus Foundation, and the Research Corporation. Gomez enjoys teaching Chemical Principles in General Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, and electives. She and her students also enjoy getting K-6 parent/child teams to tackle interesting scientific ideas through the Passport to Chemistry Adventure outreach program.

Steven Schmeiser

Associate Professor of Economics

Steven Schmeiser uses game theory and microeconomic theory to study a wide variety of topics including group formation, regulation, internet advertising, consumer behavior, and corporate law. Schmeiser has published in journals such as The International Journal of Industrial Organization, The Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, and Economics Letters. At Mount Holyoke, Schmeiser teaches courses on game theory, accounting, and corporate governance.

Steven Schmeiser

Kate Singer

Associate Professor of English; Chair of Critical Social Thought
Kate Singer