Amy E. Martin

Associate Professor of English

Specialization
Nineteenth-century British literature; nineteenth-century Irish literature; Victorian studies; postcolonial theory and theories of nationalism; gender studies; Irish studies

Amy Martin is the author of Alter-nations: Nationalisms, Terror, and the State in Nineteenth-Century Britain and Ireland (Ohio State University Press, 2012). This book investigates how Victorian cultural production on both sides of the Irish Sea grappled with the complex relationship between British imperial nationalism and Irish anticolonial nationalism. She argues that, at this interface of nationalisms in Anglo-Irish relations, certain formations central to modernity emerge, in particular new narratives of national crisis, the modern idea of 'terrorism,' the modern state form, and forms of anticolonial critique that anticipate postcolonial studies. She has published essays in Victorian Literature and Culture, the Field Day Review and several edited collections including Was Ireland a Colony? and The Black and Green Atlantic. Martin is currently working on a book project that examines internationalism and critiques of empire in nineteenth century Ireland. She has recently published an article on this subject, “Representing the ‘Indian Revolution’ of 1857: Towards a Genealogy of Irish Internationalist Anticolonialism,” in the Field Day Review (2012).

Martin teaches Introduction to the Study of Literature; Gender and Class in the Victorian Novel; Modern Irish Literature; Post-colonial Theory; and Victorian Literature and Visual Culture. In addition to being a member of the English department, she is a faculty member in Mount Holyoke's program in Critical Social Thought as well as the interdisciplinary minor in Comparative Empires.

Martin spends most summers in Dublin, Ireland, continuing her research at the National Library of Ireland and the National Archives. While in Dublin, she has also lectured as a faculty member at the Notre Dame Irish Studies Seminar and at the James Joyce Summer School.

Selected Publications

  • " Blood Transfusions: Representing Irish Immigration, the English Working Class, and Revolutionary Possibility in the Work of Carlyle and Engels" Victorian Literature and Culture, 2004 (Cambridge University Press).
  • " Fenians in the Frame: Photographing Irish Political Prisoners" with Breandan Mac Suibhne The Field Day Review No. 1 , 2005
  • "Nationalism as Blasphemy: Negotiating Belief and Institutionality in the Genre of Fenian Recollections" in Evangelicals and Catholics in Nineteenth Century Ireland (Four Courts Press, 2005)
  • "Becoming a Race Apart': Irish Racial Difference and British Class Consciousness in Engels' The Condition of the Working Class in England" in Was Ireland a Colony? (Irish Academic Press, 2005)