Standards-Based Thematic Unit
MUSIK GEGEN HASS
by Evelyn Ayres, Bobby Cranston, Wendy Ellingsen, Ken Kratt, Mickey Miller, Brynell Spencer
(for NEH Summer Institute at U. of Massachusetts)

 

Targeted Standards
1.1 Interpersonal Communication
1.2 Interpretive Communication
1.3 Presentational Communication
3.1 Practices of Culture
3.2 Acquiring Information
4.1 Language Comparisons
4.2 Cultural Comparisons
5.2 Lifelong Learning

Hier findet man tolle Musik über Fremdenfeindlichkeit und Freundlichkeit!

Many "rock groups" have embraced the fight against "Fremdenhass" as a theme in their songs. "Fremdenhass" in Germany is a manifestation of a general intolerance for all foreigners or those who appear to be "foreign." Appearance, language, and citizenship are three of the most common characteristics on which this hate is based.

There are few "civil rights" or anti-hate-crime laws to protect "foreigners." Many of these "foreigners" have families who have lived in Germany for several generations, speak German, or are even German citizens. The largest group subject to hate crimes is the Turks. Other groups subject to "Fremdenhaß" are Jews, Egyptians, Italians, Black-Germans and anyone who appears "foreign."

The activities on this web site are intended to introduce students to the topic of "Fremdenhaß" and expose them to the music of rock bands who are actively engaged in producing songs and/or videos against hate. They are mini-lessons for different levels that can stand alone, become part of a larger unit, or be used over several days to supplement regular classroom instruction.
This cartoon can be used to introduce the theme of "foreignness" in Germany. On the literal level fruit in Germany comes from many different places. More figuratively, the fruit represents the many ethnic groups in Germany. The caption reiterates the fact that Germans need foreigners and foreign products, but don't always associate those needs with the people behind the labels.


Proceed to Die Bands!


REFLECTION (Standards Targeted)
1.2 Students interpret lyrics and video.
2.1 Through engaging in the discussion of Freundlichkeit and Fremdenfeindlichkeitstudents demonstrate understanding of the relationship between Fremde and Deutsche.
2.2 Through the observation and discussion of the voicing of discontent via media focused especially toward young people, the students observe and demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the media products and perspectives of Fremde and Deutsche.
3.1 Students reinforce geography and map reading skills.
4.2 Students compare the use of rap music by minorities in Germany and the U.S.to convey discontent with the statis quo.
5.1 Through exposure to websites and youth music of German speaking countries, students are prepared to continue searching available means for personal enjoyment and enrichment.
5.2 Through exposure to websites and youth music of German speaking countries, students are prepared to continue searching available means for personal enjoyment and enrichment.

This unit allows the instructor to use a class reading as a springboard to introduce other aspects of the culture related to a topic or issue addressed in the text. The Web serves as a source of authentic materials which can be used to facilitate discussion of the cultural topic. 
Page maintained by Donna C. Van Handle.   Last modified on April 13, 2003.