Careers

The goal of the history department is to establish historical literacy, which helps people navigate the world more effectively by instilling skills and learning habits that provide a foundation for a variety of careers, including business, law, medicine, public service, and advanced research and teaching. The ability to read and write critically, to ask meaningful questions, to research, interpret, and analyze data effectively, and to frame issues for given audiences are intellectual habits that lead to a lifetime of independent learning. Historical training also provides cross-cultural skills that enable people to confront moral and political dilemmas resourcefully.

Carrie Kortegast '98
Carrie Kortegast '98: there’s so much you can do with a liberal arts degree, yet there’s so much to do with a liberal arts degree.
Anne Hyde '82
Alumnae Anne Hyde's book Empires, Nations and Families: A History of the North American West, 1800-1860 won the History profession’s most prestigious award
Claire Ricker '95
Claire Ricker '95: I advise against devaluing your history degree & encourage students to explore opportunities besides traditional history-oriented paths.
Katia Vais Bienenfield '02, Attorney/Program Officer
Katia Vais Bienenfield '02: I now run a grant-making program for Holocaust survivors and Nazi victims in the greater NYC area and globally.
Mwikali Kioko, Class of 2001
Mwikali Kioko ‘01: history and the way people have related to each other in the past has a huge role to play in the way they continue to today.
Tiffany McClain '01
Tiffany McClain '01: if every discussion about how to communicate or understand a social issue started with a history lesson, we would all be better off.
Ellie Rounds '98
Ellie Rounds '98: to read & write critically, understand historical context is important because policy work occasionally doesn't integrate it well enough.
Ruth Zager '49
Ruth P. Zager '49: the study of history aids one in evaluating the 'talking heads' and their analyses of the health issues in this country.
Carrie Phelan Thomas '74
Carrie Phelan Thomas '74: you can take your history degree and move into any one of thousands of career areas.
Holly Sprague
Holly Sprague '11: my perseverance and the guidance I received at Mount Holyoke allowed me to make my vision of serving tribal communities a reality.
Tracey (Theresa) Gilrein Kry '04
Tracey Gilrein Kry '04: work, before graduate school- whether in library science or anything else, to make sure the fit is right for you.
Julia Housten Nguyen ‘95, Senior Program Officer
Julia Husten Nguyen ‘95: not initially in the field of grant reviewing, transferrable skills as a history major and educator prepared her for her work.
As a Mount Holyoke student, Sara R. Haviland ’03 interviewed life-long civil rights activists for her thesis — leading to a doctorate and her first book.
Tiffany A. Goulet '97
Tiffany A. Goulet '97: I have taught grades 7-12 in MA, CT, Washington DC, Bangladesh, Dubai, Saudi Arabia and China.
Ruth A. Miller '97 PhD, Professor of History, University of Massachusetts Boston
Ruth A. Miller '97: Twenty years ago, the History Department prepared me for an academic career, It’s difficult to overstate how grateful I am.
Rita Kerbaj '14
Rita Kerbaj ’14: My Spanish minor gave me access to opportunities in emerging markets and the confidence to pursue them as a leader at a top startup.
Judith Hathaway Oliver ‘69
Judith Oliver '69 describes her journey as a graduate student and now professor specializing in Art History.
Amy Koler ’02 (left) and Sarah-Ann Lynch ’82 have a long history of working together.  - See more at: http://alumnae.mtholyoke.edu/blog/find-your-people-2/#sthash.sbWIje9s.dpuf
Alumnae pursue unique connections through a powerful network of powerful women.
Molly Vigour
The ability to search for information, weed through various sources, and become comfortable with new topics is an important piece of her work in law.