Message of President Roosevelt to the Senate, January 16, 1935


The movement to make international justice practicable and serviceable is not subject to partisan considerations. For years, Republican and Democratic administrations and party platforms alike have advocated a court of justice to which nations might voluntarily bring their disputes for judicial decision.

To give concrete realization to this obviously sound and thoroughly American policy, I hope that at an early date the Senate will advise and consent to the adherence by the United States to the protocol of signature of the Statute of the Permanent Court of International Justice, dated December 16, 1920, the protocol for the revision of the Statute of the Permanent Court of International Justice, dated September 14, 1929, and the protocol for the accession of the United States of America to the protocol of signature of the Statute of the Permanent Court of International Justice, dated September 14, 1929, all of which were submitted to the Senate December 10, 1930.

I urge that the Senate's consent be given in such form as not to defeat or to delay the objective of adherence.

The sovereignty of the United States will be in no way diminished or jeopardized by such action. At this period in international relationships, when every act is of moment to the future of world peace, the United States has an opportunity once more to throw its weight into the scale in favor of peace.

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
THE WHITE HOUSE.
January 16, 1935.


Source: U.S., Department of State, Publication 1983, Peace and War: United States Foreign Policy, 1931-1941 (Washington, D.C.: U.S., Government Printing Office, 1943, pp. 246-247.


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