People

Faculty

Mara Benjamin

Chair of Jewish Studies; Irene Kaplan Leiwant Associate Professor of Jewish Studies

Mara Benjamin specializes in Jewish textual traditions and practices, including biblical, rabbinic, and contemporary hermeneutics; modern Jewish thought; and gender and religion. Her first book, Rosenzweig’s Bible: Reinventing Scripture for Jewish Modernity (Cambridge, 2009), examined the theological and political stakes of the endeavor to reinvigorate Jewish intellectual and social responses to the Bible, focusing on the work of Franz Rosenzweig (1886-1929), an important Jewish religious thinker of the modern period. Her forthcoming second book, The Obligated Self: Maternal Subjectivity and Jewish Thought, investigates the religious dimensions of caring for young children in the context of Jewish thought and tradition.

Mara Benjamin, Irene Kaplan Leiwant Associate Professor of Jewish Studies

Sohail Hashmi

Chair of Asian Studies; Professor of International Relations on the Alumnae Foundation and Professor of Politics

Sohail Hashmi’s teaching and research focus on Middle East politics and on comparative international ethics, particularly concepts of just war in the West and Islam. He teaches a range of courses in both areas, including "The U.S., Israel, and the Arabs," "The U.S. and Iran," "Comparative Politics of the Middle East," "Ethics and International Relations," and "Just War and Jihad.”

Sohail Hashmi, Asian Studies Program Chair, Professor of International Relations, Alumnae Foundation Chair

Jeremy King

Professor of History

Jeremy King studied Soviet history in college, but then fell prisoner to the tragedies and charms of Central Europe. Trained at Columbia University as a historian of Austria-Hungary and its successor states, he lived for several years in Prague, Budapest, Vienna, Berlin, and a few other cities in the region. King teaches courses on Central Europe since about 1800. Themes and nodal points include nationalism, the state (liberal, democratic, fascist, and communist), "race," law, the Holocaust, public policy, and post-communism.

Jeremy King

Karen Remmler

Chair of German Studies; Professor of German Studies

Karen Remmler’s interdisciplinary research and teaching in English and German focuses on the politics and cultures of memory in the aftermath of atrocity and war in European and transnational contexts; German literature, film, and sites of memory within transnational contexts; 19th century critical social thought through the lens of contemporary social critics; and the interrelationship between national processes of transitional justice and the work of memory in films by the descendants of genocide survivors and perpetrators in non-western contexts.

Karen Remmler

Donald Weber

Lucia, Ruth and Elizabeth MacGregor Professor of English

Donald Weber’s teaching and research interests include American literature, Multi-ethnic literature, South African literature and culture, and, most recently, the imaginative landscape of contemporary multicultural London. He is currently working on two large projects: a book mapping contemporary Jewish American literature and popular culture; and a book, titled The Anxiety of Belonging, about the fraught relation between “identity” and citizenship in contemporary British and Western European literature and film. He has just returned from a sabbatical as a Visiting Fellow at the Institute of Modern Languages Research at the University of London.

Donald Weber

Staff

Laurie L. Dion

Office Assistant
Laurie Dion

Natalina Tulik

Academic Department Coordinator

Natalina Tulik is the Academic Department Coordinator for Philosophy, Religion and Jewish Studies.  She manages the budget, purchasing, online course catalog submissions, events, award applications, and all the daily needs of faculty and majors. She has been on campus since 1999. 

Natalina Tulik