Documentation for Specific Disabilities

Acquired Brain Injury/Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Neuropsychological evaluation containing assessments of visual, auditory, intellectual, and language competence
  • Description of medical and family history
  • Summary that explains how the disability affects the student's ability to learn and succeed in a college/university setting
  • Recommended accommodations and other strategies that would be helpful to ensure the student's success

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder/Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD/ADD)

  • A comprehensive, psychoeducational or neuropsychological assessment within the past three years that is scaled for adults (report should include standard scores, standard deviations and percentiles)
  • Evidence of current impairment
  • A specific psychiatric diagnosis per the DSM-IV TR
  • Information on medications and any side effects
  • Summary that addresses any functional limitations the student's disability has on the academic setting, as well as suggestions for accommodations

Autism Spectrum 

  • A comprehensive psychological or neuropsychological examination within the last three years that is scaled for adults (report should include standard scores, standard deviations and percentiles)
  • Medical, family, and developmental history
  • Detailed description of the impact the disability has in the educational environment along with recommended accommodations
  • Any medications that the student may take which could have an impact on the learning environment, including any side effects

Blindness or Low Vision

  • Assessment or evaluation from an ophthalmologist detailing the functional limitations of the disability
  • Recommended academic accommodations
  • The age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon whether the disabling condition is static or changing

Deafness or Hard of Hearing 

  • Audiogram by a licensed audiologist 
  • Summary detailing the functional limitations of the disability 
  • Recommended academic accommodations
  • The age of acceptable documentation is dependent upon whether the disabling condition is static or changing

Learning Disabilities

  • A thorough psychoeducational evaluation scaled for adults. Areas to be assessed:
  1. Aptitude: The preferred test is the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale Revised (WAIS-R). The Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery Revised: Tests of Cognitive Ability or the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale: Fourth Edition are acceptable.
  2. Achievement: Assessment of abilities in math, writing, and reading is required. Suggested tests: Woodcock-Johnson Psychoeducational Battery Revised: Tests of Achievement; Stanford Test of Academic Skills (TASK) or The Test of Written Language-2 (TOWL), Woodcock Reading Mastery Tests Revised, or the Stanford Diagnostic Mathematics Test. 
  3. Information Processing: The specific areas that must be assessed are short and long-term memory, sequential memory, auditory and visual/perception processing, processing speed. Use of the subtest from the WAIS-R or the Woodcock Johnson Tests of Cognitive Ability are acceptable.
  • Testing must be current, preferably within the past three years or after age 16. Due to the provision that all reasonable accommodations and services are based upon assessment of the current impact of the student's disabilities on her academic performance, it is important to provide recent and appropriate documentation. Date of testing must be included on report.
  • When appropriate, a clear diagnosis (i.e. NLD, CAPD) and/or a description of the functional limitations posed by the disability.
  • Recommended academic accommodations.
  • Please note: An Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) or 504 Plan alone is NOT sufficient documentation. 

Psychiatric Disabilities and Psychological Disorders 

  • An evaluation by a qualified, licensed professional
  • Current treatment and medication. This would include any counseling, specific therapies and current prescription medications. For medications, it is important to note any side effects that impact academic functioning.
  • Specific diagnosis. This should not merely refer to symptoms but should correspond to a specific DSM-IV category. Included in this should be the impact the disability/disorder has on academic function, as well as recommendations for academic and/or housing accommodations.
  • Physical Mobility, Dexterity, and Chronic Health-Related
  • Diagnosis of the disabling condition
  • Description of the functional limitations of the disability
  • Expected duration or progression of condition
  • Prescribed medications, dosages, and schedules that may influence the types of accommodations provided, including any possible side effects
  • Recommended academic accommodations

Speech Impairments

  • A clearly written statement of the disability diagnosed by a qualified professional (i.e. physician, speech/language pathologist, neurologist)
  • A summary of how these impairments affect the student in a postsecondary environment
  • Recommended academic accommodations

A Note for Students Who Are Veterans

  • Veterans who are experiencing difficulties are encouraged to make an appointment to meet with the AccessAbility Services Director. At that time, accommodations and other services can be discussed. 

A Note for Frances Perkins Students

  • Disability documentation that is more than three years old will be accepted if: a) the documentation indicates the condition is static; b) the psychoeducational evaluation submitted is scaled for adults.