meyerowitz_mh_2014_47_8_v1_01-hpr.jpg

Joel Meyerowitz (American, b. 1946), Early morning still life (detail), 1983
Photo Credit: 

Laura Shea; © Joel Meyerowitz

meyerowitz_mh_2014_47_8_v1_01-hpr.jpg

Early morning still life (detail), 1983

Joel Meyerowitz (American, b. 1946)
Vintage chromogenic print
2014.47.8

Joel Meyerowitz (American, b. 1946), Early morning still life (detail), 1983
Unknown artist (Navajo), Weaving with Yei figures (detail), ca. 1935-40
21
January
Through
10
April
2016

Hinchcliff Reception Hall

Collection Spotlight

Curated by Lynda Teller Pete, a fifth-generation weaver from the Newcomb and Two Grey Hills areas of the Navajo Nation, this collection spotlight focuses on a ca. 1935-1940 Navajo weaving of Yei figures.

Unknown artist (Apsáalooke), Toy cradleboard and doll (detai), late 19th or early 20th century
21
January
Through
10
April
2016

Hinchcliff Reception Hall

Native America and the Early Tourist Market

What should be considered art, and how do we define terms like fine art, decorative art, craft, and utilitarian? This collection spotlight, curated by Mount Holyoke College history major Allyson LaForge ’16  examines  19th- and early 20th-century objects made by Ojibwe, Haida, and Apsáalooke (Crow) craftspeople to discuss a category of material culture often described as tourist items or souvenirs.

Unknown artist (Navajo), Yeibichai dance team, ca. 1925, handspun wool, From the Collection of Rebecca and Jean-Paul Valette
19
January
Through
29
May
2016

Weissman and Garonzik Galleries

Ceremonial Imagery in Navajo Weaving

For Navajo women, the act of weaving has a sacred dimension since, according to tradition, they learned their craft from a supernatural being named Spider Woman. In the distant past, they wove warm blankets for their personal use and, on occasion, for intertribal barter.

Joel Meyerowitz (American, b. 1946), Pittsburgh, Carnival and train (detail), 1984
9
December
Through
29
May
2016

T. Marc Futter Gallery

Photographs by Joel Meyerowitz, 1979-1989

In the text to his 1985 photo-essay A Summer’s Day, Joel Meyerowitz describes his photographs as “fragile paper timeships dusted with information.” A master of color photography for more than four decades, Meyerowitz catches fleeting sensations in his images, rather than just objects or observations. The source information “dusted” across his prints is often as intangible as his metaphor suggests.