Arnaldo Pomodoro (Italian, b. 1926), Disco con sfera (Disk with Sphere), 1986
3
September
Through
20
December
2015

Hinchcliff Reception Hall

Collection Spotlight

Arnaldo Pomodoro is known for his imposing bronze sculptures in public sites like Vatican City in Rome and the United Nations Plaza in New York. Born in 1926, he began his career in the wake of World War II, as a consultant for the reconstruction of damaged public buildings in his native Italy.

Judy Pfaff (American, b. 1946), Wallabout, 1986
3
September
Through
20
December
2015

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

Judy Pfaff 1985/92

The Mount Holyoke College Art Museum recently acquired Judy Pfaff’s Wallabout (1986) and this exhibition celebrates the historical moment in the artist’s career when she made that sculpture. Between 1985 and 1992, Pfaff created large-scale, multi-media works that bridge, both conceptually and physically, the surface of the wall and the space of the gallery.

Mel Bochner (American, b. 1940), Endpapers from On Certainty (detail), 1991
21
July
Through
20
December
2015

Anne Greer and Fredric B. Garonzik Family Gallery

Illustrating Philosophy

How can a work of art illustrate an abstract philosophical idea?

Sally Mann (American, b. 1951), Yard Eggs (detail), 1991
14
July
Through
2
December
2015

T. Marc Futter Gallery

Exploring themes of absence and abundance, entropy and energy, this new installation brings together highlights from the Museum’s continuously expanding holdings in contemporary art.

Yoshida Hiroshi (Japanese, 1876-1950), Hansen: Asa [Sailboats: Morning], from the series Seto Naikai Shū [Inland Sea Collection], 1926
20
January
Through
14
June
2015

Anne Greer and Fredric B. Garonzik Family Gallery

An Artistic Legacy in Prints

Featuring 23 woodblock prints, this exhibition explores the establishment and development of the printmaking tradition of the Yoshida family, which produced multiple generations of print makers. In the 1920s, Yoshida Hiroshi—the key figure of this exhibition—turned to printmaking from his original oil-painting training and created a series of naturalistic prints that attracted domestic and international collectors.

Ellen Lanyon (American, 1926-2013), Zebra (detail), from the series Beyond the Borders
20
January
Through
26
April
2015

Hinchcliff Reception Hall

Collection Spotlight

Ellen Lanyon (1926-2013) was a celebrated artist associated with a movement of representational painters known as the Chicago Imagists. She created fantastical works throughout her sixty-year career, including the series on view, titled Beyond the Borders, which captures Lanyon’s fascination with both design and the natural world.

Isamu Noguchi (American, 1904-1988), Strange Bird, 1945/72, bronze, gift of the estate of Eileen Paradis Barber (Class of 1929), 1997.14.16
20
January
Through
31
May
2015

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

Director's Choice

The idea for this exhibition comes from something that the artist Joseph Cornell said: “Who knows what one object will have to say to another?” The joy of working with a broad permanent collection lies in having opportunities to explore the idea that objects—metaphorically—speak to one another when they are on display.

Henri Matisse (French, 1869-1954), Femme en fauteuil (Woman in chair), 1935, pencil on paper, collection of The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation, 346.203120
30
August
Through
14
December
2014

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

Curated by Ellsworth Kelly from The Pierre and Tana Matisse Foundation Collection

Henri Matisse drew constantly, and his direct, elegant draftsmanship has become a hallmark of modern art. This exhibition features Matisse drawings from across 50 years:  1900-1950. We thank Ellsworth Kelly for making a brilliant and discerning selection and for conceiving a stunning presentation of these drawings.

Ellsworth Kelly (American, b. 1923), Citron (Lemon) (detail), 1965-66
30
August
Through
14
December
2014

Anne Greer and Fredric B. Garonzik Family Gallery

by Ellsworth Kelly, 1964-66

Ellsworth Kelly began making lithographs in Paris with Maeght Editions in 1964 and over the next few years created a seminal body of work. This exhibition focuses on the series of botanical images the artist made during this period. These works are both an homage to and bold departure from Matisse’s evocative line drawings. 

Curated by John R. Stomberg, Florence Finch Abbott Director

Carrie Mae Weems (American, b. 1953), I Looked and Looked and Failed to See What so Terrified You, from the Louisiana Project series
30
August
Through
14
December
2014

Hinchcliff Reception Hall

Collection Spotlight

An installation of Carrie Mae Weems’s I Looked and Looked to See What So Terrified You (2006) continues the Museum’s series of permanent collection spotlights this fall. In this diptych, the artist portrays herself wearing a beautifully quilted dress as she looks into a handheld mirror. Each panel is the mirror image of the other. Typical of Weems’s conceptual photography, the images operate on several levels simultaneously.

Turkish, Plate, ca. 1550-1600; Chinese, One of a pair of eggshell porcelain bowls, ca. 19th century; Italian, Albarello, late 15th century
26
August
Through
14
June
2015

T. Marc Futter Gallery

Contextualizing 6,000 Years of Ceramics

Through innovation and exchange, vessels made of clay have contributed to the lives of people all across the economic spectrum, through time, and across the world. This exhibition highlights the ceramic collection of the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, which spans five continents and six thousand years.

Walker Evans (American, 1903-1975), Lunchroom Buddies, New York City, 1931
2
May
Through
25
May
2014

Carson Teaching Gallery

Walker Evans and Henri Cartier-Bresson

Inside/Outside explores the contrasting photographic sensibilities of Walker Evans and Henri Cartier-Bresson in the middle of the twentieth century. Although the two men knew and respected each other and even exhibited together, they could not have been more different in their ways with the camera. For Evans, a bookish Midwesterner, photography was a deliberate art.

Maker Unknown (American; British), EK Hadley Chest, ca. 1700
21
January
Through
8
June
2014

John and Norah Warbeke Gallery

A Collection Spotlight

This collection spotlight features an iconic piece of early 18th-century Massachusetts furniture, the Museum’s “EK” Hadley chest. This examination of the object explores the design and construction that defines this furniture tradition, the provenance of the Museum’s example, and the significance of these objects that were commissioned for young Western Massachusetts women.

El Anatsui (Ghanaian, b. 1944), New World Map, 2009, aluminum and copper wire
21
January
Through
8
June
2014

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

New Worlds

This exhibition features six of Anatsui’s large-scale sculptures—five are wall mounted and one extends into the viewers’ space across the floor. The works are all constructed in Anatsui’s signature technique of joining the bands and caps of liquor bottles into broad expanses of flexible sculpture.

Albert Bierstadt (American, born in Germany, 1830-1902), Tuolomne Meadows
1
September
Through
15
December
2013

John and Norah Warbeke Gallery

A Collection Spotlight

In celebration of the continuing fascination with Bierstadt’s painting, Hetch Hetchy Canyon, this spring the Museum will feature its iconic work alongside special guests in a Collection Spotlight. On loan from private collection, two of the artist’s other western paintings will also be on display. These loans demonstrate Bierstadt’s continuing concern with the plight of the natural world and provide context for artist and his work.

Bartolomeo Coriolano after Guido Reni, Allegory of Peace and Abundance, 1627
30
August
Through
17
December
2013

Anne Greer and Fredric B. Garonzik Family Gallery

The Italian Chiaroscuro Woodcut

Layering impressions from multiple carved blocks, the chiaroscuro woodcut is hardly discernible as a relief print, but instead appears to be fashioned with a painter’s fluid brush. These remarkable prints reveal the intricate commercial relationship between painters, woodcarvers, publishers, and patrons, and explore the timeless debate of what is an original work of art.

Barbara Bosworth (American, b. 1953), View of the Oxbow from Dry Knob (detail), archival Ink jet print, 2012
30
August
Through
17
December
2013

Hinchcliff Reception Hall

Photographs Along the New England Trail/ Barbara Bosworth

TO BE AT THE FARTHER EDGE: Photographs along the New England Trail/Barbara Bosworth is presented by the National Park Service in cooperation with the Appalachian Mountain Club and the Connecticut Forest & Park Association.

Installation view of Lorna Bieber, Eden
30
August
Through
17
December
2013

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

 Of Echoes and Grace

Using pictures she finds in books, magazines, and catalogues as raw material, the artist Lorna Bieber transforms images through copying and cropping, expanding and contracting, until she has individual elements that fit into her vision for a completed work. Her multi-paneled montages rely on the relationships between the parts to create complexity.

Maurice Prendergast (American, 1858-1924), The Waterfall (detail), 1920-23
2
May
Through
26
May
2013

Carson Teaching Gallery

Landscapes from the Permanent Collection

Although landscapes are often seen as views of static and unchanging nature, in fact they are engaged with and affected by human processes, both visible and unseen. Landscape art interprets, edits, and updates space; it is necessarily viewed and considered through the human eye.

Scott Draves, Gen 244, 2011
26
February
Through
21
April
2013

Hinchcliff Reception Hall

This World Through the Lens of New Media Art

The Mount Holyoke College Art Museum and Streaming Museum have collaborated to produce an exhibition entitled Brave New Perspectives: This World Through the Lens of New Media Art. The exhibition superimposes four new media works with questions designed to encourage visitors to critically engage with new media art. An accompanying blog, accessible via an iPad mounted in the exhibition space, further encourages dialogue.

Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), Unidentified Women, undated
22
January
Through
26
May
2013

Hinchcliff Reception Hall

An Andy Warhol Production

Andy Warhol once pinpointed the ideal condition for taking a good picture. Thinking of paparazzi out to catch “a famous person doing something unfamous,” the artist perversely suggested that the key to photography was “being in the right place at the wrong time.

Giovanni Battista Piranesi (Italian, 1720-1778), Arco di Settimio Severo [The Arch of Septimius Severus] from the series Vedute di Roma [Views of Rome], 1759
22
January
Through
26
May
2013

Anne Greer and Fredric B. Garonzik Family Gallery

This exhibition explores the multiplicity of views of Rome that appear in prints produced from the 16th to the 18th century.  Artists such as Giovanni Battista Piranesi captured the shifting balance between ancient and modern that defined the Eternal City as it went through three centuries of extensive changes.

Kara Walker (American, b. 1969), Exodus of Confederates from Atlanta, from the series Harper's Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated), 2005
31
August
Through
26
May
2013

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

Harper's Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated)

Throughout her career, Kara Walker has combined exquisite technique with biting social commentary. Her large-scale print suite Harper’s Pictorial History of the Civil War (Annotated) is considered by many to be her quintessential work in a multiple format and among the most important works in her oeuvre to date.

Maker Unknown (Peruvian), Nasca Vessel with anthropomorphic being
10
August
Through
7
July
2013

Gump Family Gallery

Faces of the Ancient Americas

To 16th-century European observers, artifacts of indigenous Mesoamerican and South American peoples possessed a scintillating foreignness that was simultaneously alluring and frightening. The perceived primitiveness of these objects persisted for centuries, with the first exhibitions of Ancient American art not appearing in the United States until the 1930s and ‘40s.

Joseph Holston (American, b. 1944), Man in Boat, 2005
10
August
Through
23
December
2012

Anne Greer and Fredric B. Garonzik Family Gallery

The Janet Hickey Tague '66 Collection

This exhibition features a selection of outstanding works on paper by prominent African American artists, all produced at the acclaimed Experimental Printmaking Institute (EPI) at Lafayette College in Easton, Pennsylvania. On view are a range of printmaking processes including serigraphs, relief prints, color etchings, and lithographs by eight internationally renowned artists: Emma Amos, David C.

John Ahearn (American, b. 1951), Thomas, 1983
1
August
Through
7
July
2013

T. Marc Futter Gallery

Contemporary Art from the Collection

The contemporary relief sculptures brought together in this exhibition are of many descriptions. Though relief is probably not the first form that comes to mind when we think of contemporary art, it is actually quite prevalent.

Darius Painter, Volute krater
3
February
Through
3
June
2012

Permanent Collection Galleries

How does one gain an understanding of antiquity from looking at works of art? In a series of thematic groupings of objects from ancient Greece and Rome, Reconstructing Antiquity explores daily life in the ancient world, representations of ancient women, and aspects of storytelling and mythology.

Faculty exhibition
3
February
Through
27
May
2012

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

The 2012 Mount Holyoke College Studio Art Faculty Exhibition

The Art Museum is honored to feature this exhibition of recent work by the studio art faculty of Mount Holyoke College.

Ouyang Xingkai (Chinese, b. 1950), Shen Jinqiu, born in 1921, now lives in No. 26 (detail)
2
September
Through
18
December
2011

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

World Documents brings together the work and ideas of important, thoughtful, and eloquent contemporary photographers. Presenting their work as competing approaches to the practice of documentary photography, it places their projects in a global setting and meditates on the possibilities and limitations facing the socially concerned photographer today.

Ogle Winston Link (American, 1914-2001), Hotshot Eastbound, Iaeger, West Virginia, N&W, August 2,1956
6
May
Through
29
May
2011

Carson Teaching Gallery

Selections from the Permanent Collection

Two landmark projects transformed American photography in 1955. In that year, Edward Steichen unveiled a blockbuster exhibition called The Family of Man at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Maker Unknown (Nayarit), Female figure, 250 BCE-250 CE
8
February
Through
19
June
2011

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

Arts of the Ancient Americas

“All the days of my life I have seen nothing that rejoiced my heart so much as these things, for I saw amongst them wonderful works of art, and I marveled at the subtle Ingenia of people in foreign lands.”

Pieter Claesz., Still-life with Roemer
2
September
Through
14
December
2010

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

Rituals, Remedies, and Revelry

Wine has been instrumental in nurturing the human spirit since ancient times. No beverage or potion has a longer history than wine, whose transformative effects on both body and spirit were recognized from its beginnings in the Neolithic age. But until recently, no serious art exhibition coupled the histories of wine and art in a cross-disciplinary fashion.

Duccio, Angel (Pinnacle from the Maestà altarpiece)
9
February
Through
30
May
2010

Harriet L. and Paul M. Weissman Gallery

Panel Painting in Early Renaissance Italy

At heart a collaborative venture, the creation of early fifteenth-century panel paintings in Italy depended upon a tight network of connections between patrons, painters, woodworkers, and gilders. The product of these interactions was an object that served both as a focus for devotion, and as an emphatic statement about wealth and status.