ABSTRACT

This study examined state dependent recall. Recall memory is best when learning and recall occur in the same state, but can be negatively affected when distractions occur between learning and recall. It was expected that those watching an emotional video would have poorer performance than those watching a neutral video. Also, those who listened to music during learning and recall were expected to have the best recall. Fifty-nine Mount Holyoke College students were tested to examine word recall from a paragraph after viewing a 5-minute video. Participants watching the emotional video recalled significantly more words than those watching a neutral video. No other significant results were found. This adds to the literature on state dependent memory recall.
 
 

INTRODUCTION

HYPOTHESIS

Participants listening to music while learning and recalling (no state change) and watching a neutral video will recall the most words from the paragraph.

    1. Participants watching the emotional video and hearing music only while learning will have the worst recall score
    2. Participants watching the emotional video and hearing music while learning and recalling will have a slightly better recall score
    3. Participants watching the neutral video and hearing music only while learning will also have a slightly better recall score
    4. Participants watching the neutral video and hearing music while learning and recalling will have the best recall score

 
 

METHOD

Participants

Materials Procedure
RESULTS

An independent groups ANOVA was run to test for significance in number of words recalled.

F(1,55)=5.78, Mse=7.33, p<0.05 F(1,55)=0.62, Mse=7.33, p>0.05 F(1,55)=1.07, Mse=7.33, p>0.05
 
 

DISCUSSION


The hypothesis that participants watching a neutral video and having no state change (listening to music while learning and recalling) would recall the most words was not supported. Our results could have been affected by many factors: This study has implications for education and television advertising.