The Relationship between self-confidence and Decision-making

Sara Adelmann, Jeannie Livingstone, Natasha Mohanty

Abstract

The study investigates the relationship between self-confidence and decision-making. Decision-making is an integral part of everyday life and level of self-confidence is related the time it takes to make a decision. The study examines the difference in the time taken to make decisions between people who have been assigned low confidence and those who have been assigned high confidence. It also looks at the difference in the time taken to answer objective versus subjective questions. Results indicate that those with assigned high confidence take longer to make a decision and it takes longer to make subjective decisions. The implications of these results are discussed.
 
 

Background

Operational Definitions
Hypothesis

The participants that are given the mock score in the lower percentile will take longest answering the subjective questions as well as reporting less confidence in answering the questions than those subjects who were given the mock top percentile confidence score, who will take the shortest time answering the objective questions and display the most confidence answering the questions.







Method

Participants: 43 Mount Holyoke College students

Materials: mock self-confidence questionnaire, assigned level of self-confidence computer program, debriefing statement

Procedure

Results

A repeated measures ANOVA was used to determine if there was a significant difference between the time taken to answer objective versus subjective questions based on the assigned level of self-confidence. The participants took a significantly longer time to answer subjective questions than to answer objective questions. The assigned high confidence score group took a significantly longer time to answer the questions than the assigned low confidence group. The interaction was not significant.

A repeated measures ANOVA was also used to determine if there was a significant difference between the confidence groups and the type of question for the reported levels of self-confidence. No significant effects were found.


 
 































 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Discussion

Also, since the confidence level was assigned, whether it was contrary to or supported their actual levels of self-confidence may have an effect on their decision-making ability. A greater sample size may have given us more appropriate results.