The Effects of Stress and Images of Food on Candy Consumption in Women
Experimenters: Sandra Bishop, Greta Greenleaf, Amy Kokot,

Ali Scheier, Nicolle Szewczyk, Cindi Woerdeman


 
 
BACKGROUND
HYPOTHESIS

  A main effect was anticipated for the stressful condition: individuals in the stressful condition were expected to consume more candy than those placed in the relaxed condition. A main effect was also anticipated in the images of food condition: participants in the condition with photographs of food were expected to consume more candy than those in the condition without pictures of food. A significant interaction was anticipated to occur between stress and images of food; participants placed in a stressful environment with pictures of food were expected to eat the most candy, when compared with those only in a stressful environment, those in a relaxed environment with pictures of food and those in a relaxed environment only, respectively.
 
 

VARIABLES

METHOD

PARTICIPANTS MATERIALS

Results

An independent groups ANOVA was used to determine if there was a significant difference between the stressful and relaxed conditions and the presence or absence of food images on the amount of candy consumed by each group. There was no main effect for the type of environment on candy consumption. Individuals in the stressful environment (M = 2.20) did not consume significantly different amounts of candy when compared with those in the relaxed environment (M = 1.87), F(1, 88) = .63, MSE = 3.91, p >.05. There was no main effect for food images on candy consumption. Individuals exposed to food images (M = 2.22) did not consume significantly differing amounts of candy as those not exposed to food images (M = 1.85), F(1, 88) = .80, MSE = 3.91, p>.05. There was no interaction between the type of environment and the presence or absence of food images, F(1, 88) = 3.41, MSE = 3.91, p >.05
 
 
Mean amount of candy consumption in women as a function of stress level and exposure to images of food.


 
 






DISCUSSION