Introduction

Maps

Archive Materials

   

Preface

Founding Years

Introspection

Transformation

Expansion

Gracious Living

Broader Diversity

Forward Looking

Home

   

Campus
Environment

Academics

Student Life

Historical Contexts

Wider World

MHC

The Fortuitous Union of South Hadley &
Mount Holyoke College

 
Map of the Village of South Hadley, 1847. The business notices contained the names and professions of 11 established businessmen within the community of South Hadley. Click here for listing. Click here to see another map of the town, 1850.
Courtesy MHC Archives
(3)
 
Map of the town of South Hadley, 1873. The Business Notices for 1873 include the names and professions of 35 established businesses in the community. There was a significant increase in the number of farmers and manufacturers of goods since 1847. Click here to see a survey map from 1873. Click here for listing.
Image acquired from Registry of Deeds, Northampton, MA
(4).
 
 
 

“The rockbound farms of the hilltowns of Massachusetts and the fertile bottom lands of the Connecticut River Valley were the genesis of Mary Lyon, the source of her strength and inspiration, and the place in which she set her enduring institution.” (5)

Pastoral Views: Traveling northbound along College Street in South Hadley, the serene images of tree lined streets, the gentle rolling hills, and the beauty of the Mount Holyoke Campus evoke a sense of awe in those who pass. This quaint American town has evolved from its’ humble beginnings as a farming village to that of a remarkable and beautiful community which cherishes its rich history. The presence of Mount Holyoke College as an institution of higher education for women has played a significant role in the development and integrity of the town.

From the single parcel of land secured for the original seminary in 1835, the college has since become the largest land owner (currently possessing 109 properties of varying sizes), tax payer, and employer within the town
(6). In the past 166 years, the changes to the campus have been nothing short of remarkable. The changes to the community itself, reflects their willingness to grow along with the college and provide both temporary and permanent homes for the thousands of students who have accepted the opportunity to experience Mary Lyons vision, and the faculty and staff who maintain the academic excellence, the business concerns, and the operational needs of the College.

More early maps of South Hadley & Mount Holyoke College Campus.

 

Atlas Home Page Community Service Homepage Early Relationship Between the Town & the College Read about some of the issues addressed between the town & MHC in 1949 References
       
 
This page was created by Anjanette Kelso-Watson '04 in History 283, Fall Semester 2003 - akelsowa@mtholyoke.edu