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Weakening of the Native Population and Culture

Negative Effects of Foreign Arrival in the Hawaiian Islands

 

Population Decline: The spread of foreign disease lead to a significant increase in the mortality rate of the Native Hawaiians resulting in substantial population decline. The Iintroduction of foreigners lead to inter-racial relations which also significantly decreased the percentage of pure blooded Hawaiians "When the islands were discovered the natives were estimated at 400,000 but they seem to be dying out, for the census of 1884 gives only 40,000 natives, and it is feared that in the course of a few years the total extinction of the race will ensue. The remainder of the population consists of 4,218 half-castes, 2,170 of foreign decent, 17,939 Chinese, and 12,237 foreigners. The Chinese are rapidly monopolizing the local trade and are valued laborers on the sugar plantations.” "Leprosy is prevalent and the government has established a settlement on Molokai, where sufferers of this disease are isolated.”

Loss of Native Cultural Dominance: A large conversion rate to Christianity was possible due to the fall of the Native Hawaiian religion. The native language eventually died out which was most likely linked to the decline in the native population and an increase in the necessity of English for commerce and trade. The English language also become dominant due to the Missionary schools and acted as a unifier in educationg many different immigrant groups. Thus, the Native Hawaiian language became immaterial and eventually died out. Today, only a small portion of the population can speak Hawaiian fluently. The Native dress was eventually completely substituted for more Westerm attire. The Missionary schools often required uniforms and the Monarchs embraced Western dress and customs. As the Hawaiian Monarchs became increasingly open to maintaining strong relations with the United States the ever altering power dynamic became to swing more and more in the favor of the United States. To read more on Hawaii's journey to statehood.

 

 
This page was created by [name student] '[grad year] in History 283, Fall Semester 2003 - [e-mail]@mtholyoke.edu