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storming_Bastille
demolition Bastille
place de la lanterre
Louis Paris July 17 1789
night of August 4 1789
  WomenMarch_to_Versailles.jpg - The Women's March to Versailles, October 5-6, 1789. Because of poor harvests in 1788 and 1789, supplies of grain fell well short of their usual level, the price of bread rose dramatically in 1789. Always a likely cause of public disturbances, the high cost and limited supply of bread and other foodstuffs in 1789 was additional factor for the mobilization of the working poor in Paris and other cities during the early stages of the French Revolution. In October, food shortages in the popular markets of Paris fostered discontent and fear, prompting market women and women consumers to show their concern by marching on foot to Versailles and calling upon the king, Louis XVI, to exercise his paternal role by securing more food for the people of Paris. The belief that the king was “the father of his people” was a traditional notion that the monarchy cultivated also cultivate to strengthen popular loyalty to the king. As the women made their way to Versailles, some men joined to escort them, but the great mass of the marchers were women. At the Chateau of Versailles, the confrontation with the King’s guards, reinforced by the National Guard under Lafayette, led to the deaths of several soldiers and possible some women. In the end, the women’s call for the king to provision the Paris markets and ensure that this was done persuaded Louis to return to Paris. The king, queen, and their children never returned to Versailles. Resettled in the Tuilleries Palace in the center of Paris, the king was no longer at a safe distance from the politics and agitation in the capital but was on site and vulnerable. The documents that follow offer evidence about the women’s march. The testimonies are interrogations of women who were charged with fomenting disorder; hence the interrogated usually express innocence and often denied having freely participated in the march.RS March 10, 2009  
MemorableDay_in_the_Revolution_6Oct1789
old regime not long to endure
awakening of the Third Estate
aristocratic hydra
peasants get their turn

The Women's March to Versailles, October 5-6, 1789. Because of poor harvests in 1788 and 1789, supplies of grain fell well short of their usual level, the price of bread rose dramatically in 1789. Always a likely cause of public disturbances, the high cost and limited supply of bread and other foodstuffs in 1789 was additional factor for the mobilization of the working poor in Paris and other cities during the early stages of the French Revolution. In October, food shortages in the popular markets of Paris fostered discontent and fear, prompting market women and women consumers to show their concern by marching on foot to Versailles and calling upon the king, Louis XVI, to exercise his paternal role by securing more food for the people of Paris. The belief that the king was “the father of his people” was a traditional notion that the monarchy cultivated also cultivate to strengthen popular loyalty to the king. As the women made their way to Versailles, some men joined to escort them, but the great mass of the marchers were women. At the Chateau of Versailles, the confrontation with the King’s guards, reinforced by the National Guard under Lafayette, led to the deaths of several soldiers and possible some women. In the end, the women’s call for the king to provision the Paris markets and ensure that this was done persuaded Louis to return to Paris. The king, queen, and their children never returned to Versailles. Resettled in the Tuilleries Palace in the center of Paris, the king was no longer at a safe distance from the politics and agitation in the capital but was on site and vulnerable. The documents that follow offer evidence about the women’s march. The testimonies are interrogations of women who were charged with fomenting disorder; hence the interrogated usually express innocence and often denied having freely participated in the march. RS March 10, 2009 Download
Caption: The Women's March to Versailles, October 5-6, 1789. Because of poor harvests in 1788 and 1789, supplies of grain fell well short of their usual level, the price of bread rose dramatically in 1789. Always a likely cause of public disturbances, the high cost and limited supply of bread and other foodstuffs in 1789 was additional factor for the mobilization of the working poor in Paris and other cities during the early stages of the French Revolution. In October, food shortages in the popular markets of Paris fostered discontent and fear, prompting market women and women consumers to show their concern by marching on foot to Versailles and calling upon the king, Louis XVI, to exercise his paternal role by securing more food for the people of Paris. The belief that the king was “the father of his people” was a traditional notion that the monarchy cultivated also cultivate to strengthen popular loyalty to the king. As the women made their way to Versailles, some men joined to escort them, but the great mass of the marchers were women. At the Chateau of Versailles, the confrontation with the King’s guards, reinforced by the National Guard under Lafayette, led to the deaths of several soldiers and possible some women. In the end, the women’s call for the king to provision the Paris markets and ensure that this was done persuaded Louis to return to Paris. The king, queen, and their children never returned to Versailles. Resettled in the Tuilleries Palace in the center of Paris, the king was no longer at a safe distance from the politics and agitation in the capital but was on site and vulnerable. The documents that follow offer evidence about the women’s march. The testimonies are interrogations of women who were charged with fomenting disorder; hence the interrogated usually express innocence and often denied having freely participated in the march. RS March 10, 2009
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