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levee en masse 1793
Counter-Revolution & Revolt 1792-1795
Vendee revolt
mass execution at Nantes
Robespierre
  assassination Marat.jpg - "The Assassination of Marat" by Jérôme Langlois a painting by David. Jean-Paul Marat, a doctor before the Revolution, became one of the great leaders of the radical, popular revolution in Paris. Founder of a newspaper called the L'Ami du Peuple [The Friend of the People]. After the flight of the King in June 1791 and the shooting of pro-republican protestors on the Champ de Mars that same year, Marat’s journalism and speeches expressed in increasingly violent terms the need for the overthrow of the Monarchy and the establishment of a democratic republic. On July 13, 1793, he was assassinated in his bath by a young woman from Normandy called Charlotte Corday. Because of his popularity he was laid to rest in the Panthéon as a hero-martyr of the Revolution. His body, however, was removed in 1795, when the radical revolution was suppressed under the Directory (1795-1799).  
temple of reason Notre Dame
revolutionary committe at work 1793
revolutionary committee in provinces
revolutionary tribunal
government of Robespierre

"The Assassination of Marat" by Jérôme Langlois a painting by David. Jean-Paul Marat, a doctor before the Revolution, became one of the great leaders of the radical, popular revolution in Paris. Founder of a newspaper called the L'Ami du Peuple [The Friend of the People]. After the flight of the King in June 1791 and the shooting of pro-republican protestors on the Champ de Mars that same year, Marat’s journalism and speeches expressed in increasingly violent terms the need for the overthrow of the Monarchy and the establishment of a democratic republic. On July 13, 1793, he was assassinated in his bath by a young woman from Normandy called Charlotte Corday. Because of his popularity he was laid to rest in the Panthéon as a hero-martyr of the Revolution. His body, however, was removed in 1795, when the radical revolution was suppressed under the Directory (1795-1799). Download
Caption: "The Assassination of Marat" by Jérôme Langlois a painting by David. Jean-Paul Marat, a doctor before the Revolution, became one of the great leaders of the radical, popular revolution in Paris. Founder of a newspaper called the L'Ami du Peuple [The Friend of the People]. After the flight of the King in June 1791 and the shooting of pro-republican protestors on the Champ de Mars that same year, Marat’s journalism and speeches expressed in increasingly violent terms the need for the overthrow of the Monarchy and the establishment of a democratic republic. On July 13, 1793, he was assassinated in his bath by a young woman from Normandy called Charlotte Corday. Because of his popularity he was laid to rest in the Panthéon as a hero-martyr of the Revolution. His body, however, was removed in 1795, when the radical revolution was suppressed under the Directory (1795-1799).
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