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Louis Seize roi de France2.
equality
Equality in classical pose
mortels are equal
Rousseau and the Revolution
  burning of Pious.jpg - "Pious VI at the Stake." In April and May of 1791, Pope Pius VI issued several papal bulls condemning the Civil Constitution of Clergy (12 July 1790) and the Revolution. In Paris at the Palais Royal in April 1791, the Pope was burned in effigy, which was the likely inspiration for this caricature. From the figure representing the Pope come bulls excommunicating bishops and priests who take the oath to the Civil Constitution, while an old women representing “religion” falls to her knees lamenting the Pope’s actions.  Other bubbles with text  criticize the Pope as debauched and greedy and carry the theme that religion is a matter of state and no longer under the control of Rome. Even before the Revolution, the so-called Gallican tradition held the French Church was somewhat independent from Rome and that king had the right to appoint bishops.  
Rouget de Lisle sings la Marsseillaise
image81
Parisian Section crossing to Tuilleries 1792
tuilleries
seige of Tuilleries

"Pious VI at the Stake." In April and May of 1791, Pope Pius VI issued several papal bulls condemning the Civil Constitution of Clergy (12 July 1790) and the Revolution. In Paris at the Palais Royal in April 1791, the Pope was burned in effigy, which was the likely inspiration for this caricature. From the figure representing the Pope come bulls excommunicating bishops and priests who take the oath to the Civil Constitution, while an old women representing “religion” falls to her knees lamenting the Pope’s actions. Other bubbles with text criticize the Pope as debauched and greedy and carry the theme that religion is a matter of state and no longer under the control of Rome. Even before the Revolution, the so-called Gallican tradition held the French Church was somewhat independent from Rome and that king had the right to appoint bishops. Download
Caption: "Pious VI at the Stake." In April and May of 1791, Pope Pius VI issued several papal bulls condemning the Civil Constitution of Clergy (12 July 1790) and the Revolution. In Paris at the Palais Royal in April 1791, the Pope was burned in effigy, which was the likely inspiration for this caricature. From the figure representing the Pope come bulls excommunicating bishops and priests who take the oath to the Civil Constitution, while an old women representing “religion” falls to her knees lamenting the Pope’s actions. Other bubbles with text criticize the Pope as debauched and greedy and carry the theme that religion is a matter of state and no longer under the control of Rome. Even before the Revolution, the so-called Gallican tradition held the French Church was somewhat independent from Rome and that king had the right to appoint bishops.
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