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meeting_EstatesGeneral_5May1789
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storming_Bastille
demolition Bastille
  place de la lanterre.jpg - "View and Perspective of 'la Lanterne'" c. July 1789. The popular violence surrounding the fall of the Bastille and its aftermath, spontaneous and beyond the control of the city authorities, was ritualized in scenes such as this in the square in front of the Hotel de Ville in Paris, known as the Place de Grève, and long the site of hangings and even more grisly public executions such as the breaking on the wheel. Continuing this tradition of making public punishment a spectacle, the people of Paris chose the Place de Grève as the site to display on the tips of pikes the heads of slain “enemies of the people,” which included Launay (Governor of the Bastille) and Bertier de Sauvigny (Royal Intendant of Paris) and Foulon who briefly replaced the popular Necker as finance minister.  In the idiom of the popular revolution, the Place de Grève was renamed “la lanterne” and referred to carrying out of revolutionary justice in this fashion before the introduction of the Guilotine.  
Louis Paris July 17 1789
night of August 4 1789
WomenMarch_to_Versailles
MemorableDay_in_the_Revolution_6Oct1789
old regime not long to endure

"View and Perspective of 'la Lanterne'" c. July 1789. The popular violence surrounding the fall of the Bastille and its aftermath, spontaneous and beyond the control of the city authorities, was ritualized in scenes such as this in the square in front of the Hotel de Ville in Paris, known as the Place de Grève, and long the site of hangings and even more grisly public executions such as the breaking on the wheel. Continuing this tradition of making public punishment a spectacle, the people of Paris chose the Place de Grève as the site to display on the tips of pikes the heads of slain “enemies of the people,” which included Launay (Governor of the Bastille) and Bertier de Sauvigny (Royal Intendant of Paris) and Foulon who briefly replaced the popular Necker as finance minister. In the idiom of the popular revolution, the Place de Grève was renamed “la lanterne” and referred to carrying out of revolutionary justice in this fashion before the introduction of the Guilotine. Download
Caption: "View and Perspective of 'la Lanterne'" c. July 1789. The popular violence surrounding the fall of the Bastille and its aftermath, spontaneous and beyond the control of the city authorities, was ritualized in scenes such as this in the square in front of the Hotel de Ville in Paris, known as the Place de Grève, and long the site of hangings and even more grisly public executions such as the breaking on the wheel. Continuing this tradition of making public punishment a spectacle, the people of Paris chose the Place de Grève as the site to display on the tips of pikes the heads of slain “enemies of the people,” which included Launay (Governor of the Bastille) and Bertier de Sauvigny (Royal Intendant of Paris) and Foulon who briefly replaced the popular Necker as finance minister. In the idiom of the popular revolution, the Place de Grève was renamed “la lanterne” and referred to carrying out of revolutionary justice in this fashion before the introduction of the Guilotine.
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