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Vendee revolt
mass execution at Nantes
Robespierre
assassination Marat
temple of reason Notre Dame
  revolutionary committe at work 1793.jpg - "A Revolutionary Committee during the Terror." Begun in 1793, revolutionary committees were formed in neighborhoods of cities, in towns, and even villages to keep a watchful eye on foreigners and other suspected of being opponents of the Revolution. When the official policy of Terror was introduced by the National Convention in September 1793 against the foreign and domestic "enemies of liberty," these committees were charged with enforcing the policy. In this color engraving produced in 1798 reflected the moderate effort to suppress popular radicalism and the role of the Terror. It thus presents a rather negative view of the popular revolutionary committees. An upper-class (likely noble) family is being ushered into to face questioning by committee members, some serving as judges while others point accusing fingers at the family, as the husband presents a document attesting to their good standing. On the right, two sans-culottes drink; on the walls of the room there are a copy of the Declaration of Rights of Man, a red cap of revolution, and two busts, one being that of Marat, a cult hero of Parisian sans-culottes. This engraving was made after a painting by Fragonard the younger, the son of the famous 18th century painter and raised by his father and Jacques-Louis David.  
revolutionary committee in provinces
revolutionary tribunal
government of Robespierre
Robespierre arrested july 27 1794
execution Robespierre

"A Revolutionary Committee during the Terror." Begun in 1793, revolutionary committees were formed in neighborhoods of cities, in towns, and even villages to keep a watchful eye on foreigners and other suspected of being opponents of the Revolution. When the official policy of Terror was introduced by the National Convention in September 1793 against the foreign and domestic "enemies of liberty," these committees were charged with enforcing the policy. In this color engraving produced in 1798 reflected the moderate effort to suppress popular radicalism and the role of the Terror. It thus presents a rather negative view of the popular revolutionary committees. An upper-class (likely noble) family is being ushered into to face questioning by committee members, some serving as judges while others point accusing fingers at the family, as the husband presents a document attesting to their good standing. On the right, two sans-culottes drink; on the walls of the room there are a copy of the Declaration of Rights of Man, a red cap of revolution, and two busts, one being that of Marat, a cult hero of Parisian sans-culottes. This engraving was made after a painting by Fragonard the younger, the son of the famous 18th century painter and raised by his father and Jacques-Louis David. Download
Caption: "A Revolutionary Committee during the Terror." Begun in 1793, revolutionary committees were formed in neighborhoods of cities, in towns, and even villages to keep a watchful eye on foreigners and other suspected of being opponents of the Revolution. When the official policy of Terror was introduced by the National Convention in September 1793 against the foreign and domestic "enemies of liberty," these committees were charged with enforcing the policy. In this color engraving produced in 1798 reflected the moderate effort to suppress popular radicalism and the role of the Terror. It thus presents a rather negative view of the popular revolutionary committees. An upper-class (likely noble) family is being ushered into to face questioning by committee members, some serving as judges while others point accusing fingers at the family, as the husband presents a document attesting to their good standing. On the right, two sans-culottes drink; on the walls of the room there are a copy of the Declaration of Rights of Man, a red cap of revolution, and two busts, one being that of Marat, a cult hero of Parisian sans-culottes. This engraving was made after a painting by Fragonard the younger, the son of the famous 18th century painter and raised by his father and Jacques-Louis David.
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