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  Hungarian nationalism 1848.jpg - "Hungary Rises." A symbolic painting accompanying a poem by Alexandre Petöfi, “Equality, Liberty, and Fraternity.” The poet is the central figure surrounded by the leaders of the Hungarian revolution: from left to right—Louis Kossuth, Minister of Finances and chief leader of the revolutionaries, General Georges Klapka, President of the newly formed government of Hungary in 1848, General Jozef Bem, Polish General who joined the Hungarian revolution.  At the left are the soldiers of the new government, formed mainly from former officers and men of the Austrian army; at the left, peasant insurgents armed with scythes and rifles. The Poem reads :  
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 "Hungary Rises." A symbolic painting accompanying a poem by Alexandre Petöfi, “Equality, Liberty, and Fraternity.” The poet is the central figure surrounded by the leaders of the Hungarian revolution: from left to right—Louis Kossuth, Minister of Finances and chief leader of the revolutionaries, General Georges Klapka, President of the newly formed government of Hungary in 1848, General Jozef Bem, Polish General who joined the Hungarian revolution. At the left are the soldiers of the new government, formed mainly from former officers and men of the Austrian army; at the left, peasant insurgents armed with scythes and rifles. The Poem reads : Download
Source: Bernard Michel, ed., Etats et Nationalités dans L'Europe du XIXe siècle | Copyright: Documentation Française, Paris (nd) | Caption: "Hungary Rises." A symbolic painting accompanying a poem by Alexandre Petöfi, “Equality, Liberty, and Fraternity.” The poet is the central figure surrounded by the leaders of the Hungarian revolution: from left to right—Louis Kossuth, Minister of Finances and chief leader of the revolutionaries, General Georges Klapka, President of the newly formed government of Hungary in 1848, General Jozef Bem, Polish General who joined the Hungarian revolution. At the left are the soldiers of the new government, formed mainly from former officers and men of the Austrian army; at the left, peasant insurgents armed with scythes and rifles. The Poem reads : Rise Hungarians, your country calls! The time is now, now or never! Shall we be slaves or free? This is the question, choose! To the God of the Hungarians We swear, We swear we shall be slaves no longer! The name of Hungary will again be resplendent Crowned by its ancient glory: Let us cleanse ourselves of the Shame that centuries have sullied upon us! In the name of God of Hungarians We swear! We swear we shall be slaves no longer.
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