Up States and Nationalities in Europe, 1848-1900 » Hungary Prev Next

 Previous image  Next image  Index page
 
 
 
 
Hungarian nationalism 1848
  Kossuth_insurrection.jpg - Kossuth calls for a national revolt in Hungary, September 1848. The partial autonomy of Hungary that arose after the March revolution in Vienna, came under assault in the fall. Faced with an attack by an Austrian army of 50,000 troops on Hungarian soil, Louis (Lajos) Kossuth (1802-1894) traveled by train to the small town of Cegled in the Hungarian plain to call upon the townsmen and peasants to join a national insurrection against Austria.  A work of national mythmaking, the painting depicts a kind of Hungarian “levee en masse” in response to the inspiring call to the colors of the by-then legendary revolutionary leader, Kossuth. When the revolt was suppressed by the Austrian army, aided by Russia, Kossuth fled and lived the rest of his life in exile, a revered figure.  
cavalry_Hungarian_village
 
 
 
 

 Kossuth calls for a national revolt in Hungary, September 1848. The partial autonomy of Hungary that arose after the March revolution in Vienna, came under assault in the fall. Faced with an attack by an Austrian army of 50,000 troops on Hungarian soil, Louis (Lajos) Kossuth (1802-1894) traveled by train to the small town of Cegled in the Hungarian plain to call upon the townsmen and peasants to join a national insurrection against Austria. A work of national mythmaking, the painting depicts a kind of Hungarian “levee en masse” in response to the inspiring call to the colors of the by-then legendary revolutionary leader, Kossuth. When the revolt was suppressed by the Austrian army, aided by Russia, Kossuth fled and lived the rest of his life in exile, a revered figure. Download
Source: Bernard Michel, ed., Etats et Nationalités dans L'Europe du XIXe siècle | Copyright: Documentation Française, Paris (nd) | Caption: Kossuth calls for a national revolt in Hungary, September 1848. The partial autonomy of Hungary that arose after the March revolution in Vienna, came under assault in the fall. Faced with an attack by an Austrian army of 50,000 troops on Hungarian soil, Louis (Lajos) Kossuth (1802-1894) traveled by train to the small town of Cegled in the Hungarian plain to call upon the townsmen and peasants to join a national insurrection against Austria. A work of national mythmaking, the painting depicts a kind of Hungarian “levee en masse” in response to the inspiring call to the colors of the by-then legendary revolutionary leader, Kossuth. When the revolt was suppressed by the Austrian army, aided by Russia, Kossuth fled and lived the rest of his life in exile, a revered figure.
Total images: 3 | Help