Bohemianism and Counter-Culture

Bohemian Identity

Welcome

Identity
Geography
   Cafe Culture

Lifestyle
   Daily Life
Fashion
Dandyism

Participants
Writers
   Hugo
       Hernani

   Murger

   Baudelaire
   Borel

Women
   Grisettes

Artists
   Courbet
   Millet
   Thackeray

Students/Youth
   Marius

Evolution
Generations
La Boheme
London 1900's
Beat Culture
Hippie Culture
Rent

Works Cited

To William Makepeace Thackeray, Bohemia is

"a land over which hangs an endless fog, occasioned by much tobacco; a land of chambers, billiard-rooms, supper-rooms, oysters; a land of song...of delicious reading of novels, magazines, and saunterings in many studios a land...where most are poor, where almost all are young, and where, if a few oldsters do enter, it is because they have preserved...their youthful spirits, and the delightful capacity to be idle."

-(Cross, 109)

picture courtesy of www.bohemiabooks.com

Bohemia was more than a place, as Thackeray realized.

Bohemia can be defined as a geographical location, or a certain time period. Bohemian identity was not created in such specific terms; rather, it was a collection of day-to-day happenings that participants observed and learned from. From different beliefs and experiences emerged a single idea.

That idea was Bohemia.