Breaking the Social Stereotypes of the 19th Century French Poor

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Figure 1

Taken from Fuchs, Rachel. Abandoned Children. 1984. pg. 195

This graph depicts the percentage of abandoned children, in the care of the state, who died in the country and the percentage who died in the city hospices between 1820 and 1880. As seen the higher percentage died in the country with the wet-nurses and foster families than in the hospice, even though the children were sent to the country, according to state officials, for the betterment of their health.

Figure 2

Taken from Fuchs, Rachel. Abandoned Children. 1984. pg. 195

This graph illustrates the percentage of infants who died in Avallon, after they were abandoned in Paris between the 1810 and 1890. As evident, the percentage of infants who died decreases as the century progressed. This may in fact been a result of the reforms that occurred in the later part of the century.

 

Mortality by Disease: Infants Abandoned in Paris And Sent to Avallon (in Percentages, 1874-1906)
1874-1875
1885-1895
1896-1906
Diarrhea, Gastro-Instestinal Diseases
44.5
37.1
44.3
Pneumonia, Lung-Respiratory Diseases
12.5
9.3
10.0
Maladies of Nervous System
11.7
18.5
20.3
Cellular Hardening (athrepsie)
3.1
2.0
-----
General Sickness (including Grippe, Diphtheria, Measles & Syphilis)
21.1
26.0
17.0

Figure 3

Taken from Fuchs, Rachel. Abandoned Children. 1984. pg. 218

This chart presents the percentage of infants who died from various disease between the years 1874-1906. The majority of the infants died from Diarrhea and other Gastro-Instestinal Diseases, which was most likely the result of malnuttition and dehydration. Therefore, this depicts the chronic lack of care towards the children.

 

Figure 4

Taken from Fuchs, Rachel. Abandoned Children. 1984. pg.

This chart displays the percentage of infants who died in the hospices, the country, and the total number of deaths for the years 1815-1872. This chart illustrates the slow decrease in the number of deaths throughout the century. Even though the number of infants who dieed decreased, it is important to keep in mind that the decrease was very minimal, and that for the majority of the time more than fifty percent of the infants died.

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