Spring 2001
Mr. Schwartz

 

 

Syllabus
Course
      Compact
Information
       Form
Reading for       Efficiency
Abstracts
Presentations
Presentation     Schedule
Pariticipation
Teams
Images
Topics and Notes
Web Page       Construction
Les Misérables:
     Table of      Contents
Reserve List
Subject
     Bibliography
Special     Collections     Bibliography

Video Capture
Defining a Site
Model template
Main Points
Evaluaiton

Illustrations from
      the novel    

 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

Les Misérables
Victor Hugo (1862)
(on line text)

Complete Table of Contents

Volume I, Fantine

 

BOOK FIRST.  AN UPRIGHT MAN

 

I. M. Myriel

 

II. M. Myriel becomes M. Welcome.

 

III. A Hard Bishopric for a Good Bishop.

 

IV. Works corresponding to Words.

 

V. Monseigneur Bienvenu made his Cassocks last too long

 

VI. Who guarded his House for him

 

VII. Cravatte

 

VIII. Philosophy after Drinking.

 

IX. The Brother as depicted by the Sister

 

X. The Bishop in the Presence of an Unknown Light

 

XI. A Restriction.

 

XII. The Solitude of Monseigneur Welcome

 

XIII. What he believed

 

XIV. What he thought

 

BOOK SECOND.  THE FALL

 

I. The Evening of a Day of Walking

 

II. Prudence counseled to Wisdom

 

III. The Heroism of Passive Obedience

 

IV. Details concerning the Cheese Dairies of Pontarlier

 

V. Tranquility

 

VI. Jean Valjean

 

VII. The Interior of Despair.

 

VIII. Billows and Shadows.

 

IX. New Troubles

 

X. The Man aroused.

 

XI. What he does

 

XII. The Bishop works.

 

XIII. Little Gervais

 

BOOK THIRD.  THE YEAR 1817

 

I. The Year

 

II. A Double Quartette.

 

III. Four and Four

 

IV. Tholomyès is so Merry that he sings a Spanish Ditty

 

V. At Bombardas.

 

VI. A Chapter in which they adore Each Other

 

VII. The Wisdom of Tholomyès

 

VIII. The Death of a Horse

 

IX. A Merry End to Mirth

 

BOOK FOURTH.  TO ENTRUST IS SOMETIMES TO ABANDON

 

I. One Mother meets Another Mother

 

II. First Sketch of Two Unprepossessing Figures

 

III. The Lark

 

BOOK FIFTH.  THE DESCENT

 

I. The History of a Progress in Black Glass Trinkets

 

II. Madeleine

 

III. Sums deposited with Laffitte

 

IV. M. Madeleine in Mourning

 

V. Vague Flashes on the Horizon

 

VI. Father Fauchelevent

 

VII. Fauchelevent becomes a Gardener in Paris

 

VIII. Madame Victurnien expends Thirty Francs on Morality

 

IX. Madame Victurnien's Success

 

X. Result of the Success

 

XI. Christus nos Liberavit.

 

XII. M. Bamatabois's Inactivity.

 

XIII. The Solution of Some Questions connected with the

 

Municipal Police.

 

BOOK SIXTH.  JAVERT

 

I. The Beginning of Rest

 

II. How Jean can become Champ

 

BOOK SEVENTH.  THE CHAMPMATHIEU AFFAIR

 

I. Sister Simplice

 

II. The Shrewdness of Master Scaufflaire.

 

III. A Tempest in a Brain

 

IV. Fo assumed by Suffering during Sleep

 

V. Clogs in the Wheels

 

VI. Sister Simplice put to the Proof

 

VII. The Traveller Arrives and Provides for His Return

 

VIII. Admission by Favor

 

IX. A Place for Arriving at Convictions

 

X. The System of Denegations

 

XI. Champmathieu more and more Astonished

 

BOOK EIGHTH.  COUNTER-STROKE

 

I. In What Mirror M. Madeleine Looks at his Hair

 

II. Fantine Happy

 

III. Javert Satisfied.

 

IV. Authority Resumes Its Sway.

 

V. A Fitting Tomb

 

 

 

Volume II, Cosette
 

 

 

BOOK FIRST.  WATERLOO

 

I. What You Meet in Coming from Nivelles

 

II. Hougomont

 

III. The Eighteenth of June, 1815

 

IV. A

 

V. The Quid Obscurum of Battles.

 

VI. Four o'clock in the Afternoon

 

VII. Napoleon in a Good Humor.

 

VIII. The Emperor puts a Question to the Guide Lacoste

 

IX. The Unlooked For

 

X. The Plateau of Mont Saint Jean.

 

XI. Sad Guide to Napoleon; Good Guide for Bulow.

 

XII. The Guard

 

XIII. The Catastrophe

 

XIV. The Last Square

 

XV. Cambronne

 

XVI. Quot Libras in Duce?

 

XVII. Must We Approve Waterloo?

 

XVIII. Recrudescence of Divine Right

 

XIX. The Field of Battle at Night

 

BOOK SECOND.  THE SHIP ORION

 

I. Number 24601 Becomes Number 9430

 

II. In Which a Couple of Lines Will Be Read Which Came, Perhaps, from the Evil One

 

III. Showing that the Chain of the Iron Ring Must Needs Have Undergone a Certain Preparation to Be Thus Broken by on Blow of the Hammer

 

BOOK THIRD.  FULFILLENT OF THE PROMISE TO THE DEPARTED

 

I. The Water Question at Montfermeil

 

II. Two Portraits Completed [1] 

 

III. Men must have Wine and Horses Water

 

IV. A Doll Enters Upon the Scene

 

V. The Little One All Alone

 

VI. Which Perhaps Proves the Intelligence of Boulatruelle [2] 

 

VII. Cosette Side by Side with the Unknown in the Dark

 

VIII. The Inconvenience of Entertaining a Poor Man Who is Perhaps Rich

 

IX. Thénardier Manoeuvring

 

X. Who Seeks the Best May Find the Worst

 

XI. Number 9430 Comes up Again, and Cosette Draws It

 

BOOK FOURTH.  THE OLD GORBEAU HOUSE

 

I. Master Gorbeau

 

II. A Nest for Owl and Wren

 

III. Two Misfortunes Mingled Make Happiness

 

IV. What the Landlady Discovered

 

V. A Five Franc Piece Falling on the Floor Makes a Noise

 

BOOK FIFTH.  A DARK CHASE NEEDS A SILENT HOUND

 

I. The Zigzags of Strategy

 

II. It Is Fortunate That Vehicles Can Cross the Bridge of Austerlitz

 

III. See the Plan of Paris of 1727[3] 

 

IV. Groping for Escape

 

V. Which Would Be Impossible Were the Streets Lighted with Gas[4] 

 

VI. Commencement of an Enigma

 

VII. The Enigma Continues

 

VIII. The Enigma Redoubles

 

IX. The Man with the Bell

 

X. In Which Is Explained How Javert Lost the Game

 

BOOK SIXTH.  PETIT PICPUS

 

I. Petite Rue Picpus, No. 62

 

II. The Obedience of Martin Verga [5] 

 

III. Severities [Austerities]

 

IV. Gaieties

 

V. Distractions

 

VI. The Little Convent

 

VII. A Few Outlines in This Shade[6] 

 

VIII. Post Corda Lapides.

 

IX. A Century under a Guimp

 

X. Origin of the Perpetual Adoration

 

XI. End of the PetitPicpus[7] 

 

BOOK SEVENTH.  PARENTHESIS[8] 

 

I. The Convent as an Abstract Idea

 

II. The Convent as a Historical Fact

 

III. Upon What Conditions We Can Respect the Past

 

IV. The Convent from the Light of Principle

 

V. Prayer.

 

VI. The Absolute Excellence of Prayer

 

VII. Precautions to be Taken in Censure

 

VIII. Faith—Law

 

BOOK EIGHTH.  CEMETERIES TAKE THAT WHAT IS GIVEN THEM

 

I. Which Treats Of The Manner of Entering The Convent

 

II. Fauchelevent in the Presence of a Difficulty

 

III. Mother Innocent

 

IV. In Which Jean Valjean Has Quite the Appearance of Having Read Austin Castillejo

 

V. It is Not Enough to Be a Drunkard to Be Immortal[9] 

 

VI. In the Narrow House[10] 

 

VII. In Which Will Be Found the Origin of the Saying: Don't Lose Your Card

 

VIII. Successful Examination

 

IX. The Close [Cloistered]

 

 

 

Volume III, Marius
 

 

 

BOOK FIRST.  PARIS ATOMISED[11] 

 

I. Parvalus

 

II. Some of his Private Marks

 

III. He is Agreeable

 

IV. He May Be Useful

 

V. His Frontiers

 

VI. A Scrap of History

 

VII. The Gamin Will Have his Place in the Classifications of India[12] 

 

VIII. In which the Reader will find a Charming Saying of the Late King [13] 

 

IX. The Ancient Soul of Gaul

 

X. Ecce Paris, ecce Homo [14] 

 

XI. Ridicule and Reign [15] 

 

XII. The Future Latent in the People[16] 

 

XIII. Little Gavroche

 

BOOK SECOND.  THE GREAT BOURGEOIS

 

I. Ninety Years Old and Thirty-two Teeth [17] 

 

II. Like Master, Like Dwelling

 

III. Luke Esprit [Luc Esprit Gillenormand]

 

IV. An Inspiring Aspirant

 

V. Basque and Nicolette

 

VI. In Which We See La Magnon and Her Two Little Ones

 

VII. Rule—Never Receive Anybody Except in the Evening[18] 

 

VIII. Two Do Not Make a Pair

 

BOOK THIRD.  THE GRANDFATHER AND THE GRANDSON

 

I. An Ancient Salon[19] 

 

II. One of the Red Specters of That Time[20] 

 

III. Requiescant[21] 

 

IV. End of the Brigand [22] 

 

V. The Utility of Going to Mass, to Become a Revolutionary[23] 

 

VI. What It Is to Have Met a Churchwarden [24] 

 

VII. Some Petticoat[25] 

 

VIII. Marble against Granite[26] 

 

BOOK FOURTH.  THE FRIENDS OF THE ABC

 

I. A Group Which Almost Became Historic[27] 

 

II. Blondeau's Funeral Oration by Bossuet

 

III. Astonishments of Marius[28] 

 

IV. The Back Room of the Café Musain

 

V. Enlargement of Horizon[29] 

582

VI. Res Augusta

 

BOOK FIFTH.  THE EXCELLENCE OF MISFORTUNE

 

I. Marius Needy

 

II. Marius Poor

 

III. Marius a Man

 

IV. M. Mabeuf [30] 

 

V. Poverty a Good Neighbor of Misery

 

VI. The Supplanter[31] 

601

BOOK SIXTH.  THE CONJUNCTION OF TWO STARS

605

I. The Nickname: Mode of Formation of Family Names [32] 

605

II. Lux Facta Est[33] 

607

III. Effect of the Spring[34] 

609

IV. Commencement of a Great Distemper[35] 

610

V. Sundry Thunderbolts Fall upon Ma'am Bougon

612

VI. Taken Prisoner [36] 

613

VII. Adventures of the Letter U Abandoned to Conjunctures

615

VIII. Even the Invalides May Be Lucky[37] 

617

IX. Eclipse

618

BOOK SEVENTH.  PATRON MINETTE

621

I. The Mines and Miners [38] 

621

II. The Lowest Depth [39] 

623

III. Babet, Gueulemer, Claquesous, and Montparnasse[40] 

624

IV. Composition of the Band[41] 

626

BOOK EIGHTH.  THE NOXIOUS POOR

629

I. Marius, Looking for a Girl with a Hat, Meets a Man with a Cap

629

II. A Waif

630

III. Quadrifons [42] 

632

IV. A Rose in Misery

636

V. The Judas of Providence [43] 

642

VI. The Wild Man in his Lair

644

VII. Strategy and Tactics

647

VIII. The Sunbeam in the Hole

650

IX. Jondrette Weeps Almost

652

X. Price of Public Cabriolets: Two Francs an Hour

655

XI. Offer of Service by Misery to Grief [Wretchedness]

658

XII. The Use made of M. Leblanc's Five Franc Piece

660

XIII. Solus cum Solo, in Loco Remoto, Non Cogitabantur Orare Pater Nester

665

XIV. In which a Police Officer Gives a Lawyer Two Fisticuffs

667

XV. Jondrette Makes his Purchases

670

XVI. In Which Will Be Found the Words to an English Air which was in Fashion in 1832

672

XVII. Use of Marius' Five Franc Piece

675

XVIII. Marius' Two Chairs Face Each Other

679

XIX. The Distractions of Dark Corners

680

XX. The Ambuscade [Trap]

683

XXI. The Victims Should Always be Arrested First [44] 

703

XXII. The Little One Who Cried in Part Second [Volume II]

707

Volume IV, Saint Denis

 

 

711

BOOK FIRST.  A FEW PAGES OF HISTORY[45] 

 

I. Well Cut[46] 

711

II. Badly Sewed [47] 

715

III. Louis Philippe

718

IV. Crevices under the Foundation

724

V. Facts from Which History Springs and Which History Ignores

729

VI. Enjolras and his Lieutenants

739

BOOK SECOND.  EPONINE

743

I. The Field of the Lake

743

II. Embryonic Formation of Crimes in the Incubation of Prisons[48] 

747

III.An Apparition to Father Mabeuf

751

IV. An Apparition to Marius

754

BOOK THIRD.  THE HOUSE IN THE RUE PLUMET

759

I. The House with a Secret [49] 

759

II. Jean Valjean as a National Guard

762

III. Folios ac Frondibus [50] 

765

IV. Change of Grating [Gate]

767

V. The Rose Discovers That She Is an Engine of War[51] 

771

VI. The Battle Commences [52] 

775

VII. To Sadness,  Sadness and a Half

778[53] 

VIII. The Chain [54] 

782

BOOK FOURTH.  AID FROM BELOW MAY BE AID FROM ABOVE

791

I. Wound without, Cure Within

791

II. Mother Plutarque Is Not Embarrassed on the Explanation of a Phenomenon[55] 

793

BOOK FIFTH.  THE END OF WHICH IS UNLIKE THE BEGINNING

800

I. Solitude and the Barracks

800

II. Fears of Cosette

801

III. Enriched by the Commentaries of Toussaint

804

IV. A Heart under a Stone[56] 

806

V. Cosette after the Letter

810

VI The Old Are Made to Go Out When Convenient

812

BOOK SIXTH.  LITTLE GAVROCHE

815

I. The Malevolent Trick of the Wind

815

II. In Which Little Gavroche Takes Advantage of Napoleon the Great[57] 

817

III. The Fortunes and Misfortunes of Escape

837

BOOK SEVENTH.  ARGOT [SLANG]

849

I. Origin

849

II. Roots

854

III. Argot Which Weeps and Argot Which Laughs[58] 

861

IV. The Two Duties: To Watch and to Hope [59] 

865

BOOK EIGHTH.  ENCHANTMENTS AND DESOLATIONS

869

I. Sunshine

869

II. The Stupefaction of Complete Happiness

873

III. Shadow Commences

875

IV. A Cab Rolls in English and Yelps in Argot

878

V. Things of the Night

884

VI. Marius Becomes So Real as to Give Cosette His Address

885

VII. The Old Heart and the Young Heart in Presence 

890

BOOK NINTH.  WHERE ARE THEY GOING?

901

I. Jean Valjean

901

II. Marius

902

III. M. Mabeuf[60] 

904

BOOK TENTH.  JUNE 5th, 1832

908

I. The Surface of the Question

908

II. The Bottom of the Question[61] 

911

III. A Burial; Opportunity for Re-birth

915

IV. The Ebullitions of Former Times[62] 

920

V. Originality of Paris

924[63] 

BOOK ELEVENTH.  THE ATOM FRATERNIZES WITH THE HURRICANE

927

I. Some Insight into the Origin of Gavroche's Poetry—Influence of an Academician upon That Poetry

927

II. Gavroche on the March

929

III. Just Indignation of a Barber

932

IV. The Child Wonders at the Old Man

933

V. The Old Man

935

VI. Recruits

937

BOOK TWELFTH.  CORINTH[64] 

939

I. History of Corinth from Its Foundation [65] 

939

II. Preliminary Gaity

943

III. Night Begins to Gather over Grantaire

951

IV. Attempt at Consolation upon the Widow Hucheloup

953

V. Preparations

956

VI. While Waiting[66] 

958

VII. The Man recruited in the Rue des Billettes[67] 

961

VIII. Several Interrogation Points concerning One Le Cabuc, Who Perhaps Was Not Le Cabuc

968

BOOK THIRTEENTH.  MARIUS ENTERS THE SHADOW

968

I. From the Rue Plumet to the Quartier SaintDenis

968

II. Paris—An Owl's View of Paris [68] 

970

III. The Extreme Limit

972

BOOK FOURTEENTH.  THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR

978

I. The Flag: First Act

978

II. The Flag: Second Act

980

III. Gavroche Would Have Done Better To Accept Enjolras' Carbine

983

IV. The Kegl of Powder

984

V. End of Jean Prouvaire’s Rhyme

986

VI. The Agony of Death after the Agony of Life

987

VII. Gavroche as a Profound Calculator of Distances

991

BOOK FIFTEENTH.  THE RUE DE L'HOMME ARME

995

I. Blotter, Babbler

995

II. The Gamin an Enemy of Light

1002

III. While Cosette and Toussaint Sleep

1005

IV. The Excess of Gavroche's Zeal

1006

 

 

Volume V, Jean Valjean
 

 

 

BOOK FIRST.  WAR BETWEEN FOUR WALLS

1013

I. The Charybdis of the Faubourg Saint Antoine and the Scylla of the Faubourg du Temple[69] 

1013

II. What Is to Be Done in the Abyss But to Talk[70] 

1019

III. Light and Darkness

1022

IV. Five Less, One More

1023

V. What Horizon Is Visible from the Top of the Barricade

1029

VI. Marius Haggard, Javert Laconic

1032

VII. The Situation Grows Serious

1033

VIII. The Gunners Produce a Serious Impression

1037

IX. Use of That Old Poacher Skill and That Infallible Shot Which Influenced the Conviction of 1796

1039

X. Dawn

1041

XI. The Shot Which Misses Nothing and Kills Nobody

1043

XII. Disorder a Partisan of Order

1045

XIII. Gleams Which Pass

1047

XIV. In Which Will Be Found the Name of Enjolras' Mistress

1049

XV. Gavroche Outside

1051

XVI. How Brother Becomes a Father

1053

XVII. Mortuus Pater Filium Moriturum Expectat

1061

XVIII. The Vulture Becomes Prey

1062

XIX. Jean Valjean Takes His Revenge

1065

XX. The Dead Are Right and the Living Are Not Wrong[71] 

1067

XXI. The Heroes

1074

XXII. Foot to Foot

1078

XXIII. Orestes Fasting and Pylades Drunk [72] 

1080

XXIV. Prisoner

1083

BOOK SECOND.  THE INTESTINE OF THE LEVIATHAN

1086

I. The Land Impoverished by the Sea

1086

II. The Ancient History of the Sewer

1089

III. Bruneseau

1091

IV. Details Ignored

1094

V. Present Progress

1097

VI. Future Progress

1098

BOOK THIRD.  MIRE BUT SOUL

1102

I. The Cloaca and Its Surprises

1102

II. Explanation

1107

III. The Man Spun

1108

IV. He Also Bears His Cross

1112

V. For Sand as Woman, There Is a Fineness Which Is Perfidy[73] 

1115

VI. The Fontis

1118

VII. Sometimes We Get Aground When We Expect to Get Ashore

1120

VIII. The Torn Coat-Tail

1122

IX. Marius Seems to Be Dead to One Who is a Good Judge

1126

X. Return of the Prodigal Son—of His Life

1130

XI Commotion in the Absolute

1131

XII. The Grandfather

1133

BOOK FOURTH.  JAVERT OFF THE TRACK

1138

I. Javert off the Track

1138

BOOK FIFTH.  GRANDSON AND GRANDFATHER

1148

I. In Which the Tree with Plate of Zinc Plaster Once More

1148

II. Marius, Escaping from Civil War, Prepares for Domestic War

1151

III. Marius Attacks

1151

IV. Mademoiselle Gillenormand at Last Thinks It not Improper That Monsieur Fauchelevent Should Come With Something Under His Arm

1157

V. Deposit Your Money Rather in Some Forest Rather than with Some Notary

1162

VI. The Two Old Men Do Everything, Each in His Own Way, That Cosette May Be Happy

1163

VII. The Effects of Dreams Mingled with Happiness

1169

VIII. Two Men Impossible to Find

1171

BOOK SIXTH.  THE WHITE NIGHT

1176

I. The 16th of February, 1883[74] 

1176

II. Jean Valjean Still Has His Arm in a Sling

1184

III. The Inseparable

1191

IV. The Immortal Jecur [Liver]

1193

BOOK SEVENTH.  THE LAST DRAUGHT FROM THE CUP

1198

I. The Seventh Circle and the Eighth Heaven

1198

II. The Obscurities Which a Revelation May Contain

1212

BOOK EIGHTH.  THE TWILIGHT WANE

1219

I. The Basement Room

1219

II. Other Steps Backward

1223

III. They Remember the Garden of the Rue Plumet [75] 

1225

IV. Attraction and Extinction

1229

BOOK NINTH.  SUPREME SHADOW, SUPREME DAWN

1231

I. Pity for the Unhappy, but Indulgence for the Happy

1231

II. The Last Flickerings of the Exhausted Lamp

1233

III. A Pen Is Heavy to Him Who Lifted Fauchelevent's Cart

1234

IV. A Bottle of Ink Which Serves Only to Whiten

1236

V. Night Behind Which Is Dawn

1252

VI. The Grass Hides and Rain Blots Out

1260

 

 


Page: 3
 [1]The Thénardiers up close

Page: 3
 [2]Louis XVIII described

Page: 3
 [3]Map of 1727, published at Paris by Denis Thierry; the location of The Petit Picpus then and the changes wrought during the Revolution: buildings pulled down, new streets, and depositories for rubbish there

Page: 3
 [4] Urban amenities: gas lights, darkness

Page: 3
 [5]Bernardines of the Obedience of Martin Verga, attached to Citeaux (not Clairvaux), like the Benedictines. [This seems mistaken]

Page: 4
 [6]Mother Superior, Mlle de Blemeur = Mother Innocent; others; rule of silence; the sounding of the bell, “A very sonorous bell, placed beside the portress and which was heard all over the house, indicated by its variations, which were a kind of acoustic telegraph, all the acts of material life to be performed, and called to the locutory, if need were, this or that inhabitant of the house.  Each person and each thing had a special ring.  The prioress had one and one; the subprioress one and two; Six-five announced the recitation, so that the pupils never said going to recitation, but going to six-five.  Four-four was Madame de Genlis’ signal. It was heard very often.  It is the four deuce, said the uncharitable. Nineteen strokes announced a great event.  It was the opening of the close door, a fearful iron plate bristling with bolts which turned upon its hinges only before the archbishop. Page 436.

Page: 4
 [7]The Convent symbolizes the declining importance of traditional religion; Joseph De Maistre denouncer of Voltaire. “As to convents, they present a complex question.  A question of civilization, which condemns them; a question of liberty, which protects them.”  442

Page: 4
 [8]A digression on the history of religious orders.

Page: 4
 [9]Gravediggers and the burial of Mother Crucifixion;

Page: 4
 [10]The feigned burial of Jean Valjean

Page: 4
 [11]“Paris has a child and the forest has a bird; the bird is called the sparrow; the child is called the gamin.”  503

Page: 4
 [12]Gamin coined in 1834 in a work entitled Claude Gueux.  “To be present at executions is a positive duty.” 510

Page: 4
 [13]Louis Philippe

Page: 4
 [14]Gamin summed up via a comparison with the graeulus of Rome.  “Paris is a sum total.  Paris is the ceiling of the human race. . . .” “All that can be found anywhere can be found in Paris.” 513; buildings mentioned—Hotel de Ville, Notre Dame, Faubourg St. Antoine, Sorbonne, Panteon etc.  Socrates and Diderot.  A point by point comparison of the Ancient and the Parisian.

Page: 4
 [15]“Of bounds and limits, Paris has none.” 515 –more allusions.

Page: 4
 [16]The people of Paris; “the mob” of Burke; the true physiognomy of the Parisian race—where to be found

Page: 4
 [17]rue Boucherat, Rue de Normandie, Rue de Saintonge of the Gillenormand

Page: 5
 [18]“He was of the eighteenth century, frivolous and great.” 526 He had lived in the Faubourg Saint Germain, Rue Servandoni, near Saint Sulpice.  Retired to the Marais upon retiring from society.

Page: 5
 [19]Frequented several very fine and very noble salons as a bourgeois when he lived in Rue Servandoni [Saint Germain], as he was twice witty . . .529.  Decried Napoleon; allusion to Ca ira with new words, string up the Bonapartists.  Use Cat’s piece to bring to life.  The Old Regime lingers on: ancient people, wrinkled, etc. representation of the reactionaries who remembered pre-1789.

Page: 5
 [20]One of Napoleon’s faithful: Pontmarcey—the foil for the royalist father, Gillenormand.  The Great Conflict: the Revolution [and Empire] divided everyone in France.  Theme her of the Restoration’s handling of the former Napoleon faithful, reflects Hugo’s own ancestry but in reverse: the Napoleonic General as Father and his Royalist Son.

Page: 5
 [21]More on the Salon of Madame de T. “was all that Marius Pontmercy knew of the world” 537; the survivors of the Revolution came here: the Marquis de Sass---, secretary of commands to Madame de Berry, et al. including priests.  “There was the essence and the quintessence of Parisian Legitimatist society.  “Finally, since, in this century, the revolution must make itself felt everywhere, this feudal salon was, as we have said, ruled by a bourgeois.  Monsieur Gillenormand reigned there. . . .539  People of renown, even though royalists, were held in quarantine.  Ibid.  . . .”They were ultra.” 540   Need to bring in the Salons of the glittering 18th to make this understood.

Page: 5
 [22]Gillenormand retires to the Marais, rue des Filles du Calvaire

Page: 5
 [23]Marius learns of his Colonel Father from from M. Mabeuf, church warden

Page: 5
 [24]Marius’s conversion to bonapartism

Page: 5
 [25]Lt. Théodule and more about his father and Marius goes to his grave at Vernon.

Page: 5
 [26]Marius learns that his father was created a baron by Napoleon.

Page: 5
 [27]“At that period, . . ., something of a revolutionary threll was vaguely felt. Whispers coming from the depths of ’89 and of ’92 were in the air.” 561 “It was like a rising tide . . mixtures: men worshipped at the same time Napoleon and liberty.  We are now writing history.  These were the mirages of that day.” 561 written after the coup of 1851.  Members described in relation to Robespierre, Saint Just, et al.

Page: 5
 [28]Marius introduced at the Café Musain

Page: 5
 [29]Marius learns more about Napoleon—Napoleon and liberty as oxymoron.  In Marius long speech he refers to Pascal  . . . “what can be more grand? Asked Marius.  To be free, said Combeferre. 584.  Good candidate for reading in first day of class or second to illustrate the project: find the history IN les miserables!

Page: 5
 [30]A political moderate and indifferent: His political opinion was a passionate fondness for plants, and a still greater one for books . . . neither a royalist, nor a Bonapartists, nor a chartist, nor an Orleanist, nor an anarchist; he was an old-bookist.” 596

Page: 5
 [31]Political divisions revealed with the arrival at Gillenormand of his nephew Lt. Théophile, a lancer in the Grand Army.  G’s diatribe against radicals, Jacobins, Republicans; to which the silent Théodule finally says: “You are a fool.” 604

Page: 5
 [32]Marius comes of romantic age; notices Cosette in the Luxembourg Gardens

Page: 5
 [33]Same scene a year later: eyes meet

Page: 5
 [34]“This first glace of a soul which does not yet know itself is like the dawn in the sky.  609

Page: 5
 [35]Love sickness

Page: 5
 [36]“The glances of women are like certain apparently peaceful but really formidable machines.”  615

Page: 5
 [37]M. gets jealous

Page: 5
 [38]Introduction to the underworld, the bas fonds.  The catacombs.  The descending ladder: Luther, Descartes, Voltaire, Condorcet, Robespierre, Marat, Babeuf; Saint Simon, Own, Fourier are there.  The third substage of Paris is below all of this.

Page: 5
 [39]The depths of horror; the opposite of Progress, earlier seen in Book IV in the “upper mine,” the great political, revolutionary, and philosophic sap” 623  “Destroy the cave Ignorance, and you destroy the mole Crime.” 624

Page: 5
 [40]A quartet of bandits . . . ruled from 1830 to 1835 over the third-substage of Paris.” 624

Page: 5
 [41]They usually met in the waste grounds near La Salpetriere.  The band called Patron-Minette, which means morning just as entre chien et loup means night, and probably came from the hour their work ended. 626

Page: 5
 [42]Thénardier, aka Genflot, man of letters, solicits charity; aka Jondrette

Page: 5
 [43]“She [Eponine] revealed to him an entire and hideous aspect of the darkness.” 642 “there is a point, moreover, at which the unfortunate and the infamous are associated and confounded in a single word, a fatal word, Les Misérables; whose fault is it? And then, is it not when the fall is lowest that charity ought to be greatest?” 643  Marius mulling over his encounters with Eponine et al.  The hole in the wall was a kind of Judas

Page: 6
 [44]Javert reaapears

Page: 6
 [45]1830 Revolution and build up of dissatisfaction

Page: 6
 [46]The political movements of 1831-1832: one of the most peculiar and most striking periods in history.” 711;  the Fall of the Restoration, July Revolution and Monarchy

Page: 6
 [47]But the revolution of 1830 ran aground; “Who stops half way?  The bourgeosie.” 717

Page: 6
 [48]crime, punishment, criminals, underworld

Page: 6
 [49]The home of JVJ and Cosette, in the Faubourg Saint Germain, formerly the rue de Blomet; rented in October 1829

Page: 6
 [50]the garden of the house well described, a pleasure garden at one time

Page: 6
 [51]Cosette comes into beauty

Page: 6
 [52]“Cosette, like Marius, “was all ready to take fire.” Destiny brought them together. Courtship, love.

Page: 6
 [53]JVJ jealous and depressed at the appearance of Marius in Cosette’s sentiments

Page: 6
 [54]Out on an early morning walk, the chain makes it horrifying appearace. “Every form of distress was present in this chaos of a cortège.” 787 crime and punishment

Page: 6
 [55]Gavroche cannot rob the old Mabeuf

Page: 6
 [56]long reflections on the nature of love, melancholy, etc.

Page: 7
 [57]Gavroche helps two other gamins; the Great Elephant in which they sleep

Page: 7
 [58]Argot around 1750 becomes a form of resistance—insolent and jovial; reflection on the Revolution and its positive work.  Said also to be: The revolutionary sense is a moral sense.” 864

Page: 7
 [59]Hopes for progress, possibly through revolt

Page: 7
 [60]“It’s the émeutes!” 907  Insurrection

Page: 7
 [61]Emeute and insurrection contrasted: one is wrong, the other is right as the war of the few against the hole is an emeute, so the war of the whole against the faction is the insurrection, which is good: likened to August 10th 1792, but not in 14th Vendémiare; the Swiss defended the false, Bonaparted defended the true 911

Page: 7
 [62]“Nothing is more extraordinary than the first swarming of an émeute.” 920

Page: 7
 [63]“Nothing is more strange; and this is the peculiar characteristic of the émeutes of Paris, which is not found in any other capital. Two things are requisite for it, the greatness of Paris and its gaiety. It requires the city of Voltaire and of Napoleon.” 925

Page: 7
 [64]The barricade of the rue de la Chanvrerie, “that almost inexpugnable construction . . . 956

Page: 7
 [65]The wineshop called Corinth in the rue de la Chanvrerie, near the Rue Rambuteau, near the major markets, touch the rue Saint Denis at its summit; the little streets run perpendicular to Saint Denis: ‘. . . like blocks of stone in a stone yard, by narrow crevices. . . .obscure, contracted, angular lanes, bordered by ruins eight stories high.” 940  The meeting and rallying place of Courfeyrac et al. 942  A place ripped up and opened wide in 1847, made to disappear under the pavements of the Rue Rambuteau. 942

Page: 7
 [66]the signing of love-rhymes

Page: 7
 [67]infiltration by Javert

Page: 7
 [68]Looking down at the field of the immanent battle

Page: 8
 [69]the barricades of June 1848 recalled, “the grandest street war which history has seen.” 1013.  What is was at bottom?  “A Revolt of the people against itself.” 1014  Barricade of Saint Antoine described: monstrous; contrasted to the silence of the barricade of the rue du Temple

Page: 8
 [70]The barricade of the rue de la Chanvrerie “was only a rough draft and an embryo ecompared with the two colossal barricades which we have just sketched; but, for the period, it was formidable.”1019

Page: 8
 [71]Reflection on revolt and revolution at the death throes of the barricade.  “. . . our barricade is made of good intentions.” 1071  The story declared: from Hell to Heaven, from injustice to justice . . . .1074

Page: 8
 [72]Enjolras and Grantaire solemnly die as they are shot after laying down their weapons and requesting it, a kind of heroic death and martyrdom that was achieved.

Page: 9
 [73]Sinking sands, sinking sewers

Page: 9
 [74]The wedding of Marius and Cosette

Page: 9
 [75]JVJ learns the Marius has refused to use Cosette’s money, coming as did from JVJ