New Faculty 2020

Welcome to the newest members of the Mount Holyoke faculty, which was named No. 1 in Princeton Review’s “Professors Get High Marks” category in August 2020. 

“We are thrilled to welcome these wonderful artists, educators, innovators and researchers to our incredible faculty,” said Dorothy E. Mosby, interim dean of faculty and vice president for academic affairs. “I’m thrilled that they are joining us in this moment, when their minds, talents and intellectual energy are most valuable to our students, our community and our society.”

Meet Mount Holyoke’s newest faculty.

Yun-Hsuan “Melody” Su
“I’m grateful to my professors who encouraged me and sparked my passion for robotics. I love to be in that role now, inspiring students.”
Zachariah Ash-Bristol
“To see a student’s eyes light up when they understand what it’s going to look like when it goes from the paper to the stage! That’s what’s rewarding.”
Benjamin Gebre-Medhin
“Mount Holyoke is one of the places that represents most faithfully and excitingly the liberal arts ethos.”
Lisa Iglesias
“I realized that art can encapsulate the subjects and issues that I care most about. Creating art allows me to weave all these things together.”
Shan Shan
“I want my students to use what we learn to advance their fields and engage with the social and intellectual challenges of our times, to feel empowered.”
Sarah Stefana Smith
“Mount Holyoke is at the forefront of rethinking a women’s college by including trans students. Historical moments are where amazing coalitions emerge.”
James "Murphy" McCauley
“It wasn’t until college that I had teachers who were influential and helped me become better at something. Teaching is a way to make an impact.”
Anna Maria Hong
“Getting to be in a creative writing classroom is an unusual space. It’s really exciting to see people’s work grow, which frequently happens very quickly.”
Riche Barnes
“When I realized that the life of a professor is about reading, writing, and service, I thought, that’s the job for me.”
Olivia Aguilar, Leslie and Sarah Miller Director of the Miller Worley Center for the Environment
“Environmental and science learning communities can be very exclusive. How they can be more inclusive of groups that are traditionally marginalized?”