Peak Car Ownership in 2020: the Opportunity for Electric Automated Mobility as a Service

Electric, autonomous mobility as a service has the potential to transform the personal vehicle paradigm, dramatically reducing costs and environmental impact while making roads safer and less congested. In their new report “Peak Car Ownership”, Rocky Mountain Institute looks at the pathways to market adoption of electric, autonomous mobility and makes the case for the U.S. reaching peak car ownership in the next decade.

The growing market Personal vehicles have dominated the U.S. mobility system for nearly 100 years. But we are now in the formative stages of a powerful confluence of cultural, technological, and societal forces. A new mobility system may emerge in the next few years that could unlock hundreds of billions of dollars in value for mobility service providers and consumers. This future mobility system—dominated by driverless mobility services—provides a solid financial case for vehicle electrification. Electric, autonomous mobility as a service has the potential to transform the personal vehicle paradigm, dramatically reducing costs and environmental impact while making roads safer and less congested. In their new report “Peak Car Ownership”, Rocky Mountain Institute looks at the pathways to market adoption of electric, autonomous mobility and makes the case for the U.S. reaching peak car ownership in the next decade.

Dr. Lynn Daniels

Lynn Daniels is a Senior Associate in the Transportation practice at Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI), a Colorado-based nonprofit that drives the efficient and restorative use of resources. As part of RMI’s Mobility Transformation initiative in Austin, Texas, Lynn leads their Mobility as a Service project, working closely with corporations, NGOs, the Austin community to develop and implement new mobility service solutions.Prior to joining RMI in 2013, Lynn was a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. During his Fellowship, Lynn was a program manager with the Advanced Manufacturing Office and then chief technological advisor to Assistant Secretary of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, David Danielson. Lynn received his PhD in Physics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2010, and a BS in Physics from Carnegie Mellon University.