My Journey from MHC Physics to Cornell Materials Science and Engineering

Abby Goldman '10 will share her journey after graduation, which involved an international research experience, transferring PhD programs and taking a “break” from research and school. She will also present her PhD research on the “Magnetic Properties of Mosaic Crystals of Hematite,” as well as some of the other professional development activities she is pursuing during her PhD (because it’s not only about the research.)

At the start of my senior at Mount Holyoke, I had no idea if I wanted to go to graduate school or not. In my talk, I will tell you about my journey after graduation, which involved an international research experience, transferring PhD programs and taking a “break” from research and school. I hope to highlight why I ultimately decided to pursue a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) at Cornell. In the process of describing my own path, I also hope to clarify some reasons why you might want to pursue a PhD. Finally, I will present some of my PhD research on the “Magnetic Properties of Mosaic Crystals of Hematite,” as well as some of the other professional development activities I am also pursuing during my PhD (because it’s not only about the research.)

Abby Goldman

Materials Science and Engineering Ph.D. Student at Cornell

Abby Goldman graduated with her B.A. in physics from Mount Holyoke in 2010. Upon graduating, Abby traveled to Haifa, Israel on a Fulbright Fellowship for her first major foray into materials science research. After leaving Israel, Abby began a PhD program at UC Santa Barbara in materials science, but after completing one year, decided to leave the program. Abby later decided to return to graduate school, this time at Cornell University in Ithaca, NY in the department of materials science and engineering, where she has just happily begun her fourth year in a PhD program. Her research at Cornell focuses on bio-inspired crystal growth of functional materials.  She investigates how the hierarchical or complex architectures produced by bio-inspired growth techniques can help enhance functional (magnetic or optoelectronic) properties. Outside of her schoolwork, Abby has helped start up Destination Imagination, a creativity-based educational program for kids of all ages, in Central NY. In addition, she enjoys hiking around the many beautiful gorges in Ithaca and baking sweets.