Towards Quantum Materials with New Magnetic Functionalities

Prof. Checkelsky will share his research focusing on the study of exotic electronic states of matter through the synthesis, measurement, and control of solid state materials.  He will discuss emergent phenomena that we observe including dissipationless electronic currents, coupling of magnetic and electronic degrees of freedom, and also prospects for future materials development. 

A goal of the exploration of new quantum materials is the development of solid state systems with new functionalities.  Topological Insulators are a new class of quantum materials which have recently become of great interest to the physics community- these materials have electronic states that are in some ways fundamentally more robust against disorder than conventional electronic systems.  At the forefront of research in these systems is the attempt to capitalize on this unique aspect of these materials to realize new electronic capabilities.  Here we review our related work on these materials in the context of coupling to magnetism.  We will discuss emergent phenomena that we observe including dissipationless electronic currents, coupling of magnetic and electronic degrees of freedom, and also prospects for future materials development. 

Prof. Joseph Checkelsky

Professor Checkelsky joined the Department of Physics at MIT in January 2014. He received his B.S. in Physics in 2004 from Harvey Mudd College and Ph. D in Physics in 2010 from Princeton University. Before coming to MIT, Professor Checkelsky did postdoctoral work at Japan’s Institute for Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) and held the position of lecturer at the University of Tokyo. Research in Checkelsky’s  lab focuses on the study of exotic electronic states of matter through the synthesis, measurement, and control of solid state materials. These studies aim to uncover new physical phenomena that expand the boundaries of understanding of quantum mechanical condensed matter systems and also to open doorways to new technologies by realizing emergent electronic and magnetic functionalities.