A Concert of Italian Music c. 1600

Members of Palma Choralis Marcello Mazzetti (left) and Livio Ticli

Music of Luca Marenzio, Claudio Monteverdi, Salamone Rossi and others for voices, viols, lute and harpsichord, presented in conjunction with the Palma Choralis Five College Residency to be held at Mount Holyoke College on March 1 and 2.  Free and open to the public.

 

Guest artists Livio Ticli (harpsichord and voice) and Marcello Mazzetti (lute, viol and voice) of Palma Choralis, Brescia, Italy, are joined by Robert Eisenstein (viol, violin) Laurie Rabut (violin, viol), and Alicia DePaolo (voice).  The Palma Choralis Five College Residency is made possible by a grant from the Five College Lecture Fund.

Marcello Mazzetti

Italian performer and musicologist, after studying Classical Guitar, Composition and Conducting he graduated summa cum laude in Musicology in Cremona (University of Pavia) and gained a Master of Music at the International Music Academy in Milan, submitting a dissertation on the Performance Practice of Italian Renaissance Polyphony. He is a co-founder member and co-director of Palma Choralis · Research Group & Early Music Ensemble, performing across Europe (Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, The Netherlands, France, Belgium, Switzerland) as a singer, lute and gamba player with more than 500 events, among them concerts, spectacles, banquets and Liturgical worships. He recorded and premiered Spanish music by Bernardus Ycart and Sebastian Duron. He also furthered his studies in Liturgical Bibliography, Bizantine-Gregorian Chant and Palaeography under internationally-known senior scholars featuring music programs in Greece, Romania and Croatia.

Since 2010, he has been directing International Early Music Festivals such as BIEMSSF (Brescia International Early Music Summer School and Festival), which welcomes international students and performers interested in working with European leading early music ensembles, scholars specialized in HIPP and experts in Early Music Pedagogy and Improvisation.

He teaches courses at the “Santa Cecilia” School of Music in Brescia (Italy), where is co-head of the Early Music Department of Brescia and professor of Renaissance Music Theory and Performance Practice. He is completing his doctoral research on Floriano Canale - a polymath Renaissance composer - and the Italian Canons Regular Congregation at the University of Southampton (UK), presenting and premiering Canale’s music at the most important Festivals, Universities and International Conferences in Italy (Bologna, Reggio Emilia, Brescia, Venice, Rome), United Kingdom (Birmingham, Nottingham, Southampton) and USA (Washington DC, Amherst MA). He is for the second time visiting fellow at the “Arthur F. Kinney” Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies (2016, 2018) and member of the Tasso in Music Project editorial board (UMass-Amherst, Stanford University).

He studied Classical Guitar, Composition and Conducting, and graduated summa cum laude in Musicology (Cremona University) with a dissertation on polyphonic and improvising practices in Renaissance monastic congregations. He then specialized in Renaissance Polyphony at the International Music Academy in Milan undertaking a research on Composition and Performance Practice of Liturgical Chant from late Renaissance Italy. He also furthered his studies in Liturgical Bibliography, Bizantine-Gregorian Chant and Palaeography under internationally-known senior scholars (S. Martani, M. Alexandru e G. Baroffio).

Since 2010, he has been directing International Early Music Festivals such as BIEMSSF (Brescia International Early Music Summer School and Festival) and, as a singer-lutenist-gambist, he has been performing across Italy, Europe and United States for Palma Choralis · Research Group & Early Music Ensemble, which he has been directing for more than a decade. He taught courses and gave workshops on Renaissance Performance Practice at Italian Conservatoires, British and US Universities, and since 2014 he has been teaching Early Music Performance Practice at the University of Bologna.

He is currently researching the figure of Floriano Canale and Italian Canons Regular Congregation at the University of Southampton (UK), and as a musicologist he gave presentations and lectures at the most important Festivals, Universities and International Conferences in Italy (Bologna, Reggio Emilia, Brescia, Venice, Rome), United Kingdom (Birmingham, Nottingham, Southampton) and USA (Washington DC, Amherst MA). He is an editorial board member of the Tasso in Music Project (Massachusetts and Stanford University), a fellow at the “Arthur F. Kinney” Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies (2016, 2018), and since 2016 has been co-chairing the Early Music Department of Brescia (Italy) where he teaches Renaissance Music Theory and Performance Practice, and Renaissance Vocal and Instrumental Ensemble.

Livio Ticli

His musical training started from Classical Piano, Choral Singing and Recorder, and just 15-aged, he toured Italy singing Bach’s six Motets and taking part in national choral singing competitions. He then studied Composition, Historical Keyboards and Performance Practice graduating summa cum laude in Musicology and earning a master degree in Renaissance Polyphony at the International Music Academy in Milan (Italy).

In 2006, he co-founded Palma Choralis · Research Group & Early Music Ensemble (www.PalmaCHoralis.org) and, since then, he has been performing and conducting for Palma Choralis and other specialized ensembles in prestigious festivals in Italy, Spain, France, Switzerland, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, Belgium, United Kingdom and USA.

Besides singing and playing many instruments (Historical keyboards, Percussion instruments, Recorder, Renaissance Double-harp), in his performances he employs a variety of disciplines such as Historical Gestures, Renaissance Dance and Historical Acting, and he is currently carrying out a research project on Self-accompaniment, Poly-instrumentalism and Arts synergy (Southampton University UK). He also designed, directed and performed numerous Renaissance Spectacles and Banquets in cooperation with several historical dance companies offering events combining research in Early Music, Dance, Theater, and Cookery.

He is co-director of International Festivals such as BIEMSSF (Brescia International Early Music Summer School and Festival); he has been giving courses in Early Music Performance Practice and Pedagogy at the Doctorate School of Bologna University and, since 2016, he has been co-heading the Early Music Department of Brescia (Italy), where he teaches Renaissance and Baroque Singing, Historical Keyboards, and Vocal-instrumental Improvisation and Ornamentation. He has been presenting at the most important International Conferences (Universities of Birmingham UK, Nottingham UK, Southampton UK, Massachusetts USA). He is an editorial board member of the Tasso in Music Project (Massachusetts and Stanford University), and a fellow of the “Arthur F. Kinney” Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies (2016, 2018).

He also designed, directed and performed numerous Renaissance Spectacles and Banquets in cooperation with several historical dance companies offering events which aim to embody the spirit of early feasts by combining research in Early Music, Dance, Theater and Cookery.

He is co-director of International Festivals such as BIEMSSF (Brescia International Early Music Summer School and Festival), which strive to engage the general audience and foster Early Music and its connections with Culture, History, Arts, Science and Faith, especially among young generations.