Teaching and Scholarship Renewal Workshops 2018- REGISTRATION NOW CLOSED

Keynote speaker, May 15: Stephen Brookfield, author of The Skillful Teacher and Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher

Breakfast (8:30am) and Lunch (12:15pm) will be served each day, Registration required

Workshops 2018 (subject to change)

 Monday, May 14


  • 9:00-10:30am:

First Year Seminar Faculty Meeting- REQUIRED for all FYS faculty, Prof. Elizabeth Markovits with Prof. Amber Douglas

At the annual FYS Faculty meeting, we will discuss information from Fall 2017 FYS student surveys, focus groups, as well as student work, to help faculty understand what seems to be working best in terms of student learning in our program. We will spend time in small groups discussing how to incorporate those elements into our own courses, trying out ideas and hearing directly from our colleagues. We will also discuss issues about "hidden curriculum," inclusive design, and microaggressions in the FYS context.

  • 10:45am- 12:15pm:

a. Six Principles of an Inclusive Syllabus  with Kirsten Helmer, Ed. D., Director of Programming for Diversity, Inclusion, & Equity, The Institute for Teaching Excellence & Faculty Development, University of Massachusetts Amherst

As we think about transforming our course content and pedagogy in ways that reflect attention to teaching our students in inclusive and equitable ways, focusing on the re-design of our syllabus at the front end is an important starting point. Creating an inclusive classroom culture begins with the syllabus. Designing a syllabus through the lens of inclusiveness, provides instructors with the opportunity to clearly communicate their teaching philosophy and describe their best pedagogical intentions.

In this workshop, you will learn about six principles of an inclusive syllabus design. Following the presentation, you will have the opportunity to workshop and apply some of the criteria that inform inclusive syllabus design to aspects of your own syllabus. So, please bring a laptop with a copy of a syllabus. The co-presenters will be available to offer support and answer questions.

b. Well-Being in the Classroom: Students in Distress, Supporting International Students, and Engaging with Disturbing Course Material with The Counseling Services

Many faculty have close contact with students and are often the first members of the community to observe changes in appearance or behavior that may be indicative of distress. This session is divided into two parts. First, we will present an overview of common mental health concerns in students, information about recognizing and responding to students in distress, and resources for faculty about when/where/how to refer students to campus supports. We then plan to break into two groups for the rest of the session: supporting international students (conversations about culture, language, and adjustment; with Erica Weathers, LICSW, and Shirley Yuanrui Li, LCSW, MHC Class of 2013) and helping students engage with and tolerate disturbing course material while still meeting your curricular goals (what it means to be “triggered,” some of the reactions students may have to difficult course material and what they can do to manage them, and ideas about how faculty can support students, particularly when aspects of their own identities are being discussed; with Anna Hope, Ph.D., and Brittania Weatherspoon-North, Psy.D.). 

  • 1:30- 3:00pm:

a. Teaching Writing- Intensive Courses: Scaffolding and Peer Workshops with Lise Sanders (Associate Professor of English Literature and Cultural Studies, Hampshire College)

This session will focus on a variety of strategies for developing assignments and providing useful feedback in writing-intensive courses. In addition to discussing participants’ current practices and brainstorming new approaches, we will consider several different examples of scaffolded writing assignments that are designed to give students the skills to analyze primary sources, use and critique secondary scholarship, and craft a research-based paper or final project. We will also discuss techniques for incorporating a drafting and revision process, with peer review workshops and guidance in constructive criticism, into the structure of a semester-long course. The session will draw on the insights of Wayne Booth, et al. The Craft of Research (4th ed. University of Chicago Press, 2016) and will incorporate a hands-on workshop in developing assignments specific to given disciplines and/or interdisciplinary fields.

b. Makerspace Resources for Engaging with the Material World with Kathy Aidala and Shani Mensing

“Making” provides a visceral understanding of both physical and intellectual concepts, and represents a unique mode of inquiry. Modern maker culture encourages collaboration across different disciplines and broad exploration, a hallmark of the liberal arts. Find out what faculty have done with the makerspace and what resources are available to help you develop curricular activities. Time will be dedicated to brainstorming activities that might help your students engage with the material world in a way that is meaningful to them and to the goals of your course.


Tuesday, May 15


  • 9:00-10:30am

a. Connecting Classes Across Disciplines with Catherine Corson, Holly Hanson, Eva Paus & Eleanor Townsley

This workshop is for faculty members interested in connecting their course with that of a colleague in another discipline. Connecting courses leads to a broader and more complex understanding of a particular question, as it offers powerful opportunities to explore a question from different disciplinary vantage points. Workshop participants will learn about the benefits and ways of connecting courses, strategies to address the pedagogical and logistical challenges of the process, and assessment possibilities. There will be opportunities for small groups to workshop ideas about how to link courses.   

In 2017, Catherine Corson, Holly Hanson, Eva Paus, and Eleanor Townsley received a grant from the NEH in support of connecting their courses and facilitating other faculty pairs to do the same. They will report on the lessons from the first iteration of their connected course experience this spring around the theme of “Historical Imagination in the Liberal Arts: Re-Thinking Inequality through a Global-Local Lens.” In addition, Jon Western, Kavita Khory, and Nieves Romero-Diaz will share their insights from having connected classes across disciplines.

The NEH grant enables us to fund five course connections for other faculty members. While the topic may be different from the one above, it has to include the humanities. Beyond the NEH, the McCulloch Center will support up to four course connections, if they include a class that is not primarily taught in English. Nexus also offers funds to link courses associated with particular Nexus tracks. And, the Miller-Worley Center for the Environment also can provide funds for linked courses with a focus on embedding environmental education across the curriculum.

Faculty groups may consist of 2-4 faculty members. Each pair or group is expected to participate in 2-3 faculty workshop meetings during 2018-2019 to develop the course connections content (incl. assessment) and then teach the connected courses in 2019-20.

b. FYS Course Design Institue: Reflections on Critical Thinking- By Invitation Only

During the day-and-a-half FYS Course Design Institute, faculty can design (or re-design) their First Year Seminar to focus on inclusive, writing-intensive pedagogies that help students further develop their critical thinking skills. At the final Tuesday session, faculty will design meaningful critical thinking assignments that will be used the following year for program assessment. Any faculty member teaching a FYS course during the 2018-2019 academic year is eligible. Participating faculty will attend each of the following sessions during the Teaching & Scholarship Renewal Week and receive a $800 stipend.

 May 14th:

First Year Seminar Faculty Meeting

Six Principles of an Inclusive Syllabus

Teaching Writing- Intensive Courses: Scaffolding and Peer Workshops

May 15th:

FYS Course Design Institute: Reflections on Critical Thinking

  • 10:45am- 12:15pm:

Faculty Fellow Showcase with John Tawa (Psychology) & Mark Shea (English and SAW Program)

John Tawa: Fostering Students' Ethocultural Empathy Using Virtual Embodiment

Virtual worlds are increasingly being used in educational contexts (Hew & Cheung, 2010) and offer unique interactive learning experiences such as moving through an environment with a visible identity that is different from one’s own. In this study, Black, Asian, and White women sequentially operated two racialized avatars in the virtual world, Second Life. This study uses a between subject design, with some participants operating “different-race” avatars (an avatar with a racial appearance different than their real life appearance) and a control group of participants operating a same-race avatar. We expect that relative to women operating a same race avatar, those operating a different race avatar will have lower levels of implicit racial bias, colorblind racial attitudes, and essentialist beliefs about race, and will have higher levels of ethnocultural empathy, outgroup comfort, and will be more likely to demonstrate prosocial behavior on the behavioral measure of empathy.

Mark Shea: Student Inquiry into Academic Writing

This study examines changes in student writing practice as indicated by the analysis of textual features (quantitative), student reflection on their attitudes toward writing and writing practice (qualitative), and follow up interviews (qualitative). The sample for this study is an intact class (ENGL 104) of multilingual writers (n = 16) of various L1 backgrounds. The students will engage with a variety of written genres over the semester, culminating in a web-published “Guide to College Writing” as a final project. This session presents a report on an early review of the gathered data, focusing on student writing data and the published web guide.

**************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************

  • 1:30-3:15pm:

Keynote speaker, Stephen Brookfield, author of The Skillful Teacher and Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher

The Ethical Use of Teacher Power:

In the liberal arts tradition there is an understandable pedagogic emphasis on collegiality. We want to treat our students as equals and to create respectful and inclusive learning environments. For many this entails de-centering teacher authority and moving to the sidelines as students exercise their agency and take over classroom activities. Hence, the most successful discussions are often viewed as those in which the teacher says nothing and the air is full of students’ voices.

How is this de-centering of power experienced by students? In this presentation Stephen Brookfield will draw upon thousands of student classroom critical incident questionnaires (CIQ’s) to examine what it is that students most frequently appreciate about our exercise of teacher authority, and what they find disingenuous or inauthentic. He will describe techniques to democratize classrooms and the way in which the power of teacher disclosure encourages students to enter racially charged discussions. He will also consider how apparently student-centered activities can be experienced as unethical manipulation.

Wednesday, May 16


  • 9:00-10:30am

a. Workshop on Creating a Summer Research and Writing Plan with Cathy Luna

During this practical 60-minute workshop, participants will learn a process for crafting and using a scholarly research and writing plan for the summer.  Drawing on research on faculty writing productivity, I will help participants identify realistic writing goals, imagine potential obstacles, and brainstorm a wide range of emotional, behavioral, and social strategies for overcoming these obstacles and achieving their goals.  
 

b. Teaching as Research Workshop with Liz Markovits, Mark Shea, John Tawa, and Denise Pope

In this workshop, faculty will have a chance to propose and receive feedback on their own teaching-as-research and scholarship of teaching and learning projects, with an eye toward conference presentation and publication of their findings. These projects help faculty better understand how a particular teaching approach, method, assessment project, or tool can enhance undergraduate learning, using quantitative, qualitative, interpretive, or mixed methods to systematically investigate the question. Faculty interested in the TLI Faculty Fellows program are especially encouraged to apply, as are faculty in later stages of project development.

  • 10:45am-12:15pm

a. Write On Site

Want to kickstart your summer writing projects? Need colleagues around so you don't end up checking Facebook or reading the New York Times for 4 hours? Or just a reason to claim time on your calendar to write? We have reserved space in Willits for you to plug in and write alongside your colleagues. Come early, come late, stay as long as you like (but do let us know which meals you'd like)! And, if you're interested, consider signing up for an individual appointment with Cathy Luna, who will be available to help you plan our summer writing schedules.

b. Individual Writing Consultations with Cathy Luna

Please indicate if you would like to claim a 30-minute session with Cathy Luna during our Teaching & Scholarship Renewal Week. The TLI office will be in touch later on to schedule.

  • 1:30-2:45pm

a. Write On Site

Want to kickstart your summer writing projects? Need colleagues around so you don't end up checking Facebook or reading the New York Times for 4 hours? Or just a reason to claim time on your calendar to write? We have reserved space in Willits for you to plug in and write alongside your colleagues. Come early, come late, stay as long as you like (but do let us know which meals you'd like)! And, if you're interested, consider signing up for an individual appointment with Cathy Luna, who will be available to help you plan our summer writing schedules.

b. Individual Writing Consultations with Cathy Luna

 Please indicate if you would like to claim a 30-minute session with Cathy Luna during our Teaching & Scholarship Renewal Week. The TLI office will be in touch later on to schedule.