What to know about studying creative writing

Andrea Lawlor (left) and Samuel Ace, Mount Holyoke College faculty in English, spoke to U.S. News & World Report as to why students might want to study creative writing in college.

By Christian Feuerstein

Mount Holyoke College’s Department of English offers a number of courses that offer practical instruction in the techniques of fiction, poetry and other literary genres, as well as journalism. 

Mount Holyoke College faculty Andrea Lawlor and Samuel Ace spoke with U.S. News & World Report about why students might want to study creative writing in college. 

“We all are seeing more and more of the way that writing can help us understand perspectives we don’t share,” said Lawlor. “Writing can help us cope with hard situations. We can find people who we have something in common with even if there’s nobody around us who shares our experience through writing. It's a really powerful tool for connection and social change and understanding.”

“It helps students to become more direct, not to bury their thoughts under a cascade of academic language, to be more forthright,” said Ace. 

Read the story. 

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