Convocation to be livestreamed September 2.

Monday, August 25, 2014 - 2:30pm

Convocation—a student-welcome event involving raucous cheers, creative costumes, and a presidential message—will be livestreamed for the first time this year.

Starting at 11:30 am on September 2, the entire Convocation ceremony will be simulcast online. Video of the event, which will be held rain or shine in Gettell Amphitheater,  also will be posted online later in the day for those who can’t watch the live feed.

Convocation is Mount Holyoke’s traditional way of welcoming students on the day before classes begin, but the event is anything but traditional in spirit. Students are encouraged to wear their class colors, and many create elaborate headgear and handmade costumes that sometimes embody their class mascots. This year, we may see seniors as yellow sphinxes and a “Red Sea” of first-year students clad in class crimson, all moving to the beat of MHC’s West African Music Ensemble.

If you’ve never experienced Convocation, this video from last year will get you into the mood.

Despite the hoopla, Convocation has a serious side. After each class has cheered itself and its sister classes, President Pasquerella and politics professor Elizabeth Markovits will give welcome addresses. Typically the president recaps significant summer developments and gives a preview of the new academic year’s highlights. Greetings will also be given by Marcella Runell Hall, dean of students; Kathleen Pertzborn, Staff Council cochair and assistant dean of faculty; and Casey Accardi ’15, president of the Student Government Association.

Musical performances are scheduled from the MHC Convocation Choir, directed by Lindsay S. Pope ’07, and from Michelle Brooks-Thompson ’06. The former contestant on the NBC sing-off show The Voice brought down the house when she belted out “I Believe I Can Fly” at last year’s Convocation.

Then—weather permitting—there’s an all-College picnic on Skinner Green.

You won’t want to miss the fun.

• See more details about Convocation events.

—By Emily Harrison Weir