Learning through art museums on campus

Aaron Miller (right) spoke with Eric Clemons on Comcast Newsmakers. Miller is an associate curator at the Mount Holyoke College Art Museum.

By Christian Feuerstein

Aaron Miller, associate curator of visual and material culture at Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, recently appeared on Comcast Newsmakers to discuss art on campus.

“It’s very much an encyclopedic museum where we have a bit of everything: fine art, decorative art, antiquities and everything in between,” Miller said. “We have contemporary fine art and then we have a hippopotamus skull.”  

He also discussed the exhibition “Major Themes: Celebrating Ten Years of Teaching with Art,”  the collection at the Joseph Allen Skinner Museum, and the upcoming exhibition “Money Matters: Meaning, Power, and Change in the History of Currency,” which opens on August 20, 2019.

Watch the segment. 

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