LGBTQ acceptance, 50 years after Stonewall

By Keely Sexton

Fifty years after the Stonewall riots that sparked the LGBTQ movement, Lucy James-Olson ’22 talked to Delaware’s News-Journal with three other LGBTQ-identified people, each representing a different generation, about how the movement has progressed — and how far it has yet to go. 

As a student at Mount Holyoke, James-Olson said, they experience a freedom to explore gender and an openness from the community that is both enlightening and empowering. 

“[L]iving in this environment has enabled me to explore my gender in ways I did not even know I wanted to explore it,” they said. “It is a space where I feel comfortable and safe to express my gender and ask people outright to use my pronouns and am unapologetic about correcting and educating people.”

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