"Telling Our Own Stories"

Rosalyn LaPier explores how religion influences Indigenous peoples relationship with the natural world in her latest work "Invisible Reality: Storytellers, Storytakers and the Supernatural World of the Blackfeet." Encouraged by an elder to start ‘telling our own stories’ Rosalyn will discuss the complexities and ethics of writing about one’s own community and family. She will reflect on how to center community voices, work with elders, use oral histories and archival sources.

Rosalyn LaPier, PhD

Associate Professor, Environmental Studies-University of Montana

Rosalyn LaPier, PhD

Dr. Rosalyn LaPier is an award winning Indigenous writer and ethnobotanist with a BA in physics and a PhD in environmental history. Dr. LaPier studies the intersection of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) learned from elders and the academic study of environmental and religious history. As an activist, her longtime passions include environmental justice on Indigenous lands and the revitalization of Indigenous languages. This year, as a National Steering Committee member, she was one of the organizers of the March for Science, the largest day of science advocacy in history, with over one million participants in over 600 cities worldwide. She also worked on her third book as visiting faculty at the Harvard Divinity School. Dr. LaPier is an associate professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Montana and a research associate at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution. She is an enrolled member of the Blackfeet Tribe of Montana and Métis.