Vista:  Spring 98, Volume 2, Number 4

ABOVE: PHOTO BY MICHAEL ZIDE BELOW: PHOTO BY JIM GIPE

Past Pain and Future Promise
Past Pain and Future Promise

Moran on Crime & Punishment
Moran on Crime & Punishment

National Honors & Other News
National Honors & Other News

Present Digs & Past Lifestyles
Present Digs & Past Lifestyles

NEWS

NEXT


Mount Holyoke's International Students Reach Critical Mass


South hadley may be the only town of 17,000 to boast citizens of fifty-six countries among its residents. Look around professor Vincent Ferraro's International Political Economy classroom and you're nearly as likely to see students wearing shalwar kameez (a pants-and-tunic combo common on the Indian subcontinent) as blue jeans. The conversation is global too, partly due to the subject, but mostly because of who's doing the discussing. Half the students in Ferraro's course are international students. "It is not unusual for a class of twelve to include women from five different countries spread over three continents," says Christopher Rivers, dean of international affairs.

While international students make up only 3 percent of postsecondary students in America, Mount Holyoke is ranked third-highest among national liberal arts colleges for our high percentage of international students. (This U.S. News & World Report ranking was based on last year's 13 percent international enrollment.)

MHC's 220 international students---about one in every eleven women this year---bring a strikingly cosmopolitan feel to campus. You can experience it in the multitude of holidays celebrated, in the variety of languages spoken over dinner, in the globe-spanning room decor, in the diversity of opinions on any topic. "International students are woven into every segment of life," says Rivers. "They're part of our foundation, not just window-dressing."(Continued)

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