News

This is a photo of Farah Rawas '17 standing in front of the Community Center construction site.
Through its engineering and sustainability programs, Mount Holyoke has given Farah Rawas ’17 the resources she needs to help her community in Beirut.
Kate Ballantine , with a group of students examining a soil sample on the Project Stream site.
More than 100 high school students spent the day at Mount Holyoke’s restoration ecology site, learning about the environment from the ground up.
Restoration Ecology Classes
See how undergrads are digging in, designing experiments, answering questions, monitoring progress, and taking the lead in reversing ecosystem degradation
Students get to work restoring the site.
An ambitious wetland restoration project comes to life on the Mount Holyoke College campus.
Student, staff and U.S. Fish & Wildlife volunteers pose on the day of Renaissance high school’s annual field trip to Mount Holyoke.
Mount Holyoke’s Restoration Ecology Program tackles environmental challenges and seeds the field’s future by engaging students in local high schools.
Photo of restoration ecology boardwalk
Mount Holyoke College’s restoration ecology program has opened a boardwalk, inviting the community to learn about the science and enjoy the sights.
Jailene Rodriguez '20 began her Mount Holyoke career as a high school summer scholar with the Restoration Ecology Program.
Future physician Jailene Rodriguez ’20 gained hands-on lab experience in high school via Mount Holyoke’s Restoration Ecology Summer Scholars Program.
The Mount Holyoke College Botanic Garden
The Botanic Garden is a living, curated collection of plants that can be used, much like the Art Museum or library, for classes of all disciplines.
Kate Ballantine’s research on environmental revival and ecosystems at a former cranberry bog in Plymouth investigates the effects of climate change.
This is a photograph of the Project River boardwalk, with bright fall foliage in the background.
Assistant Professor Kate Ballantine was recognized as an “Environmental Ground-Breaker” for her ecological restoration work.
Tina Le ’18 was drawn to the “magnificent camellias” in the Botanic Garden for her research.
Using the College’s living lab, Tina Le ’18 developed her own independent study and gained hands-on research experience in the field of plant genetics.
MHC professor Kate Ballantine teaches restoration ecology by restoring a small campus stream and adjacent wetlands.