Faculty Fellows

The Faculty Fellows program provides MHC faculty with an opportunity to immerse themselves in the literature on pedagogical innovation and best teaching practices, while also making an original contribution to the literature themselves. Fellows undertake a teaching as research project that will help the Fellow and other faculty better understand how a particular teaching approach, method, or tool can enhance undergraduate learning. Moreover, the Fellow will have the opportunity to develop, write, and workshop an original contribution to the scholarship of teaching and learning. Over the course of the year, each Fellow will attend monthly meetings to discuss their teaching-as-research project with the other Faculty Fellow, the TLI Director, and other relevant staff. Fellows will share the completed project through the May Teaching & Scholarship Renewal workshop at MHC, as well as at least one larger academic conference, such as the Cornell Teaching as Research conference. Fellows also serve as leaders within the Teaching & Learning Initiative, attending Talking About Teaching lunches and fielding inquiries from interested colleagues.

2019-2020 Application

For more information/resources:

2019-2020 TLI Faculty Fellows

Kathryn McMenimen, associate professor of Chemistry and co-chair of Biochemistry

Increasing student agency in organic chemistry through consistent skill-building and reflection.

Kathryn McMenimen

The study will examine changes in student perception and agency during the semester as indicated by the analysis of pre- and post-semester self-reflections (qualitative), weekly “Problems of the Day” (quantitative) and evaluation of course content seven times throughout semester (quantitative). Global grade comparison over the last five years will be performed to evaluate iterative pedagogical changes (quantitative).

Darren G. Hamilton, professor of Chemistry

Increasing student agency in organic chemistry through consistent skill-building and reflection.

The study will examine changes in student perception and agency during the semester as indicated by the analysis of pre- and post-semester self-reflections (qualitative), weekly “Problems of the Day” (quantitative) and evaluation of course content seven times throughout semester (quantitative). Global grade comparison over the last five years will be performed to evaluate iterative pedagogical changes (quantitative).