Further Faults/Blackwater’s Blunders

If the incident in Fallujah was Blackwater’s first foray into the hype of the media, the ball of public notoriety didn’t stop rolling there. As a matter of fact, the multitude of events that subsequently unfolded found Blackwater caught up in scandal after scandal that drew more attention than the renowned security firm had ever anticipated, and ultimately led to Blackwater's expulsion from the country altogether by the Iraqi government. To combat the negative image it had gained in all of the media hype, the company was reorganized and christened under the new name Xe.

 

 

“When the Blackwater convoy carrying the diplomats moved toward the Green Zone, it passed through Nisour Square in western Baghdad where it entered congested traffic. Some of the Blackwater personnel got out of their vehicles and took positions on the street: then at least one guard began to fire in the direction of a car, killing its driver. Soon more shots were fired, killing a woman holding an infant sitting in the passenger seat. After the family was shot, a type of grenade or flare was fired into the car which set it ablaze. Numerous civilians were also killed as theshooting continued, including children. Iraqi officials have given several death counts, ranging from 8-20, with perhaps several dozenwounded. Blackwater guards told investigators that they were being fired on although a preliminary Iraqi investigation concluded that ‘there was no enemy fire’[15].

 

 

[11]Welch, Michael. "Fragmented Power and state-corporate killings: a critique of Blackwater in Iraq." CRIME, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE 51 (2008): 358. Web. 29 Nov. 2010. <http://www.springerlink.com/content/555272775q3r17v2/>.

[12]Welch, Michael. "Fragmented Power and state-corporate killings: a critique of Blackwater in Iraq." CRIME, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE 51 (2008): 358. Web. 29 Nov. 2010. <http://www.springerlink.com/content/555272775q3r17v2/>.

[13]Welch, Michael. "Fragmented Power and state-corporate killings: a critique of Blackwater in Iraq." CRIME, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE 51 (2008): 358. Web. 29 Nov. 2010. <http://www.springerlink.com/content/555272775q3r17v2/>.

[14]Welch, Michael. "Fragmented Power and state-corporate killings: a critique of Blackwater in Iraq." CRIME, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE 51 (2008): 354. Web. 29 Nov. 2010. <http://www.springerlink.com/content/555272775q3r17v2/>.

[15]Welch, Michael. "Fragmented Power and state-corporate killings: a critique of Blackwater in Iraq." CRIME, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE 51 (2008): 355. Web. 29 Nov. 2010. <http://www.springerlink.com/content/555272775q3r17v2/>.

[16]Schulman, Daniel. "Blackwater's Gunrunners." Mother Jones 23 Feb. 2010. Web. 20 Nov. 2010. <http://motherjones.com/politics/2010/02/blackwater-paravant-unauthorized-weapons-afghanistan-levin>.

[17]Schulman, Daniel. "Blackwater's Gunrunners." Mother Jones 23 Feb. 2010. Web. 20 Nov. 2010. <http://motherjones.com/politics/2010/02/blackwater-paravant-unauthorized-weapons-afghanistan-levin>.

[18]Welch, Michael. "Fragmented Power and state-corporate killings: a critique of Blackwater in Iraq." CRIME, LAW AND SOCIAL CHANGE 51 (2008): 356. Web. 29 Nov. 2010. <http://www.springerlink.com/content/555272775q3r17v2/>.