HERE ARE LEGISLATIVE DOCUMENTS DEVELOPED IN ORDER TO DETER AND ERADICATE CHILD LABOR

INTERNATIONAL CONVENTIONS PROHIBITING CHILD LABOR AND SETTING AGE STANDARDS

  • Minimum Age Convention 138 (C138), 1973 See Document
  • Covention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), 1989 See Document
  • Worst Forms of Child Labour Convention 182 (C182), 1999 See Document

U.S LAWS PROHIBITING THE IMPORTATION OF GOODS MADE WITH CHILD LABOR

  • The Sanders Amendment to the U.S Tarrif Act of 1930

The Tariff Act of 1930 prohibits the importation of products made with "forced or indentured labor" into the United States. In 1997, the Sanders Amendment clarified that this applies to products made with "forced or indentured child labor."

  • The Generalized System of Preferences (GSP)

Enacted in 1974, the GSP program authorizes approximately 4,284 products from 140 developing countries, including India and Nepal, to enter the United States market duty-free. In 1984, new provisions took away U.S. trade preferences from countries that systematically deny internationally recognized workers' rights. These rights include: freedom of association; the right to organize and bargain collectively; a prohibition of any form of forced or compulsory labor; and acceptable conditions of work with respect to minimum wages, hours of work and occupational safety and health.

  • Trade and Development Act of 2000

This Act, signed into law in May 2000, affords special trade benefits to Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean Basin countries. Section 411 clarifies that the ban on articles made with forced and/or indentured labor under the Trade Act of 1930 now includes goods made with forced and/or indentured child labor. Section 412, worst forms of child labor, denies U.S. trade preferences to countries that fail to meet and effectively enforce the standards established by ILO C182.