Entrepreneurship, Organizations, and Society

Undergraduate

The interdisciplinary minor in Entrepreneurship, Organizations, and Society (EOS) offers you a knowledge framework and practical competencies to make a positive contribution to communities, locally and globally.

The interdisciplinary minor in Entrepreneurship, Organizations, and Society aims to prepare you for the economic realities and social challenges of today’s world. The minor can be combined with any major.

Program Overview

Envisioning socially impactful action requires an understanding of problems from multiple perspectives, of difference along multiple axes, of the dynamics of organizations, and of individual and collective agency in social context. And advancing solutions demands creative thinking, resilience and risk-taking, collaboration with multiple stakeholders, and command of basic business practices.

In EOS, you will learn to develop such understandings and competencies through engagement in four subject areas, applied learning experiences, and connections with practitioners in the field.

The curriculum consists of four subject areas:

  • Entrepreneurship
  • Organizations and Power
  • Structures of Inequality
  • Financial Analysis

If you choose to minor in EOS, you will choose one approved course from each of the four areas, with one course at the 300 level. You are encouraged to integrate your course work with applied learning experiences and to interact with practitioners in their field. You should select a coherent set of courses and applied learning experiences that fit your specific interests and aspirations. You should seek advice from the member of the EOS committee who best matches your interest.

Community Voices

Spotlight on EOS students and alums

Jaia Colognese ’22

she/her

Barbara Schmidt-Rahmer ’80 Social justice entrepreneur

Sonia Mistry ’03 Senior Program Officer

Courses and Requirements

Requirements for the Minor

A minimum of 16 credits:

One course in Area One: Entrepreneurship 14
One course in Area Two: Organizations and Power 14
One course in Area Three: Structures of Inequality 14
One course in Area Four: Financial Analysis 14
Of the four courses, one must be at the 300 level 1
Total Credits16
1

A full list of the approved courses for each required area within the minor appears at the end of the Entrepreneurship, Organizations, and Society Courses section.

EOS Course Offerings

EOS-210 Opportunities, Impact and Social Entrepreneurship

Spring. Credits: 4

Problem identification and analysis, opportunity recognition, and engaging with the local manifestation of global challenges is at the foundation of addressing social and environmental challenges, developing beneficial social impacts, and being engaged in all aspects of entrepreneurship. Students will learn about global-local intersection and about addressing significant problems through team projects to create an action, business, social enterprise or organization that involves local stakeholders and creates solutions. Project-based learning with readings, lectures, and classroom discussions.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-229 Enterprise Startups and Social Entrepreneurship

Fall. Credits: 4

This is a project-based experiential learning course teaching entrepreneurial teams to rapidly build, test, and cycle through models on the way to discovering and implementing an organization, designing and providing a product or service, and offering a solution to a global-to-local problem. Students will learn about and engage in the creation and building process, while exploring and discovering key issues in social impact, organizations and groups, creative solutions, economics, and finance. The course will adapt the Lean LaunchPad methodology, involve case-studies, and provide research and analytical articles.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-231 Global Entrepreneurship

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

We will explore and discuss the policies, procedures, demands, related data (costs, investment levels, success rates, etc.) and impacts of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial activity in a variety of countries and at the global level, making use of reports, case studies, data centers and organizations. Expect to explore comparisons such as: who are entrepreneurs? who tends to be successful? which governments, societies and economic systems are most supportive? which are least supportive? what are the varieties of entrepreneurial activity? has entrepreneurial activity had economic and social impacts?

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
R. Feldman
Prereq: ECON-110.

EOS-239 Fundamentals of Business Organizations and Finance

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

Students will create and manage organizations, learn from topical lectures, readings and case studies, and hear from guest speakers. The course will cover core organizations: not-for-profits, "C" corporations, "S" corporations, partnerships, and the LLC (limited liability company) plus special variations like workers cooperatives and social venture variations known as benefit corporations and L3C companies. Students will also learn how to analyze and present financial information and gain competency with basic spreadsheets and analytical tools. Finally, students will consider organizations in their social contexts, discussing the relationship of organization types to social issues at global and local scales.

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-249 Ethics in Entrepreneurship and Business

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course uses the traditional approaches of moral philosophy to explore ethical challenges and obligations faced by individuals, businesses, and organizations in an increasingly complex global environment. Through consideration of philosophical theories and particular cases we explore issues such as the social roles and ethical obligations of businesses or organizations; rights and responsibilities of workers, managers, and owners; ethics in sales and marketing; and ethics in a global business environment.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-260EB
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Writing-Intensive
L. Sizer
Notes: This course is strongly recommended for students interested in participating in the International Business Ethics Case Competition.

EOS-295 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

EOS-295P Independent Study with Practicum

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 4

The department
Instructor permission required.

EOS-299AR Topic: 'Ethics and Artificial Intelligence'

Spring. Credits: 4

Artificially intelligent technologies are prominent features of modern life -- as are ethical concerns about their programming and use. In this class we will use the tools of philosophy to explore and critically evaluate ethical issues raised by current and future AI technologies. Topics may include issues of privacy and transparency in online data collection, concerns about social justice in the use of algorithms in areas like hiring and criminal justice, and the goals of developing general versus special purpose AI. We will also look at ethics for AI: the nature of AI 'minds,' the possibility of creating more ethical AI systems, and when and if AIs themselves might deserve moral rights.

Crosslisted as: PHIL-260AR, DATA-225AR
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
L. Sizer

EOS-299LA Topic: 'Leadership in the Liberal Arts'

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

What makes a great leader? Can we identify who should be a leader? Are leaders born or made? How does an education in the liberal arts prepare someone to become a leader? Through reading a mix of the Great Books of Western Civilization (e.g., Homer, Plato, Shakespeare) and contemporary classics in leadership studies, we will explore these and other related questions.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive
J. Hartley

EOS-299ND Topic: 'Individuals and Organizations'

Spring. Credits: 4

This course focuses on individual and small-group behavior in the organizational setting. The class will focus on: (1) understanding human behavior in an organizational context; (2) understanding of oneself as an individual contributor and/or leader within an organization, and ways to contribute to organizational change; (3) intergroup communication and conflict management; and (4) diversity and organizational climate.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-212
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
B. Packard
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors

EOS-299RJ Topic: 'Research, Ethics, Justice, and Campus Sustainability'

Fall. Credits: 4

The course is designed for students interested in learning about and doing qualitative research on campus sustainability. We will discuss the logic of qualitative social research and examine a range of methods, considering the specific advantages and limitations of different techniques. Students will also discuss ethical issues, including the challenges of conducting research in cross-cultural settings, reflect on our own underlying assumptions, motivations and values in research, and consider what it means to decolonize methodologies. The course is a term-based learning course in which students work in teams to conduct research on a topic of their choice related to sustainability literacy on the Mount Holyoke College campus. Students share and discuss weekly assignments in class, and then analyze and present their results.

Crosslisted as: ENVST-251
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
C. Corson
Restrictions: Course limited to sophomores, juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits of social science or humanities courses.
Advisory: Students from a variety of disciplines are welcome.

EOS-310 Social Entrepreneurship Capstone

Spring. Credits: 4

Project-based learning course: students bring ideas, projects, and plans to develop toward implementation. Learn about organization startup in social and environmental context. Students engage in class discussions and attend short lectures and, working individually or in teams, develop projects to an implementation stage. Results include having a well-designed solution that delivers real benefit to identified stakeholder(s).

Applies to requirement(s): Meets No Distribution Requirement
Other Attribute(s): Community-Based Learning, Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
R. Feldman, V. Pastala
Instructor permission required.
Prereq: EOS-210 or EOS-229.
Advisory: During advising week, students should email Professor Feldman with a request and brief explanation as to why they are interested.

EOS-341 Advanced Managerial Economics

Not Scheduled for This Year. Credits: 4

This course will use an intensive case-study approach mixed with lectures, readings, and discussions. The focus is investigating the economics of management and enterprise (firms, organizations) decision-making in local/regional, national, and global settings, the intersections of economic considerations with social and political considerations, and the frameworks and tools for analyzing the behaviors and decisions of various enterprises. Class participation in the discussions is essential. Students will also develop and provide presentations of case analyses.

Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
The department
Prereq: ECON-110 plus at least one other upper-level Economics or EOS/Entrepreneurship course.

EOS-349BC Topic: 'History of British Capitalism'

Spring. Credits: 4

This is a research seminar, designed to introduce students to classic and recent debates on the "history of capitalism" and to support original research on a broad array of topics related to the social and cultural history of economic life. Rather than take British capitalism as exemplary of modernization we will situate that which was particular about the British case against the pluralities of capitalism that have evolved over the past three centuries. Topics include revolutions in agriculture, finance, commerce and manufacturing; the political economy of empire; the relationship between economic ideas, institutions and practice; and, the shaping of economic life by gender, class and race.

Crosslisted as: HIST-357
Applies to requirement(s): Humanities
Other Attribute(s): Speaking-Intensive, Writing-Intensive
D. Fitz-Gibbon
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 4 credits in History.

EOS-349MV Topic: 'Motivation'

Fall. Credits: 4

In this course we will examine multiple theories of motivation and their relevance across a range of organizational settings (including corporations, special programs, and schools or colleges). How do we spark interest in a new subject or inspire people to undertake a challenging project? How do we sustain persistence in ourselves and others? This course is relevant for students interested in motivation, whether for attainment (such as within in human resources, talent development, or management) or for learning (whether for students, teachers, or leaders). Because motivation is closely linked to learning and achievement, in addition to well-being and purpose, we will also consider these topics and more.

Crosslisted as: PSYCH-337MV
Applies to requirement(s): Social Sciences
B. Packard
Restrictions: This course is open to juniors and seniors
Prereq: 8 credits in psychology or entrepreneurship, organizations, and society (EOS).

EOS-395 Independent Study

Fall and Spring. Credits: 1 - 8

The department
Instructor permission required.

Courses Counting toward the Minor in Entrepreneurship, Organizations, and Society

A student minoring in EOS must take one course from each subject area, with at least one course at the 300 level. 

Area One: Entrepreneurship

Being an entrepreneur in today’s rapidly changing world requires the ability to apply critical, analytical and creative thinking to the global and local problems at hand, process large amounts of information from a range of knowledge areas, work in teams, assess financial resource requirements and feasibility, and communicate effectively. In these courses, students start to develop these capabilities.

Entrepreneurship, Orgs & Soc
EOS-210Opportunities, Impact and Social Entrepreneurship4
EOS-229Enterprise Startups and Social Entrepreneurship4
EOS-231Global Entrepreneurship4
EOS-299RJTopic: 'Research, Ethics, Justice, and Campus Sustainability'4
EOS-310Social Entrepreneurship Capstone4
EOS-349MVTopic: 'Motivation'4

Area Two: Organizations and Power

Organizations are central structures of society. Nonprofits, public institutions, and private businesses are all shaped by the particular histories, legal traditions, and relationships of power in different societies. To function well in organizations and leverage them to affect social needs, students need to understand the roles of different types of organizations, hierarchies of power, regulatory frameworks, social impacts, and ethical decision-making in organizational structures. These courses provide students with such understandings.

Economics
ECON-249EDTopics in Economics: 'Economics of Education'4
ECON-249HPTopics in Economics: 'Economics of Shopping: An Introduction to Industrial Organization'4
ECON-307Seminar in Industrial Organization4
ECON-326Economics of the Digital Economy4
ECON-349DVAdvanced Topics in Economics: 'Development Economics: A Closer Look in Africa'4
Educational Studies
EDUST-339EPSeminar in Educational Studies: 'Educational Policy'4
Entrepreneurship, Orgs & Soc
EOS-249Ethics in Entrepreneurship and Business4
EOS-299ARTopic: 'Ethics and Artificial Intelligence'4
EOS-299LATopic: 'Leadership in the Liberal Arts'4
EOS-299NDTopic: 'Individuals and Organizations'4
EOS-349BCTopic: 'History of British Capitalism'4
Gender Studies
GNDST-206MAWomen and Gender in History: 'Mary Lyon's World and the History of Mount Holyoke'4
History
HIST-259Mary Lyon's World and the History of Mount Holyoke4
HIST-357History of British Capitalism4
Philosophy
PHIL-260ARTopics in Applied Philosophy: 'Ethics and Artificial Intelligence'4
PHIL-260EBTopics in Applied Philosophy: 'Ethics in Entrepreneurship and Business'4
Politics
POLIT-232Introduction to International Political Economy4
POLIT-248GRTopics in Politics: 'Grassroots Democracy'4
Psychology
PSYCH-212Individuals and Organizations4
Sociology
SOCI-216MKSpecial Topics in Sociology: 'Marketing and Society'4
SOCI-216QDSpecial Topics in Sociology: 'Qualitative Research and Data Analysis'4
SOCI-316NQSpecial Topics in Sociology: 'Organizations and Inequality'4
SOCI-316RMSpecial Topics in Sociology: 'Consumer Culture: Race in the Marketplace'4
SOCI-316SYSpecial Topics in Sociology: 'The Business of Culture: Marketing & Selling Symbolic Goods'4

Area Three: Structures of Inequality

To effect positive change, students need to understand the structures of inequality underlying many of the problems they aim to address. In these courses, students learn how systemic forces shape inequality along different axes (e.g., race, class, gender, sexuality, religion, and nationality), and how individual, collective and government actions interact with these dynamics in pursuit of greater social justice.

Economics
ECON-213Economic Development4
ECON-215Economics of Corporate Finance4
ECON-228Political Economy4
ECON-241Critical Development Studies4
ECON-306Political Economy of Inequality4
ECON-314Globalization and Development4
ECON-349ECAdvanced Topics in Economics: 'Analysis of Empire of Cotton'4
Environmental Studies
ENVST-210Political Ecology4
Entrepreneurship, Orgs & Soc
EOS-349BCTopic: 'History of British Capitalism'4
Geography
GEOG-208Global Movements: Migrations, Refugees and Diasporas4
GEOG-223Development Geography4
GEOG-313Third World Development4
History
HIST-208The Consumer Revolution: A History of Shopping4
HIST-276U.S. Women's History Since 18904
HIST-357History of British Capitalism4
Politics
POLIT-252Urban Politics4
POLIT-267The Politics of Finance and Financial Crises4
POLIT-277Dislocation: Class and Politics in the U.S.4
POLIT-355Race and Housing4
POLIT-387PEAdvanced Topics in Politics: 'The 1%'4
Sociology
SOCI-239How Capitalism Works: Social Class, Power, and Ideology4
SOCI-316DGSpecial Topics in Sociology: 'Sociology of Development and Globalization'4
SOCI-316FNSpecial Topics in Sociology: 'Finance, Globalization, and Inequality'4
Spanish
SPAN-350MGAdvanced Studies in Concepts and Practices of Power: 'Spanish Migrations'4

Area Four: Financial Analysis

Assessing, accessing and effectively employing resources to address social needs are important elements of entrepreneurship. In these courses students learn and gain practice in understanding, analyzing and using financial resource information and processes.

Economics
ECON-218International Economics4
ECON-249METopics in Economics: 'Introduction to Managerial Economics'4
ECON-270Accounting4
Entrepreneurship, Orgs & Soc
EOS-239Fundamentals of Business Organizations and Finance4
EOS-341Advanced Managerial Economics4

Contact Us

The interdisciplinary study of Entrepreneurship, Organizations, and Society helps prepare students from all majors for the economic realities and social challenges of today’s world.

Rick Feldman
  • Lecturer in Entrepreneurship, Organizations and Society
  • Entrepreneurship Coordinator
  • Nexus Track Chair for Nonprofit Organizations & Society

Next Steps

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