Residence Hall Descriptions

We offer housing in many configurations to meet the developing needs of our students. We provide apartment and suite style options, in addition to traditional singles, doubles and triples. First-year students should anticipate living in a traditional space with up to three other roommates. Returning Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors will select their room type in the annual Housing Lottery.

While each residence hall is unique in design and character, each hall features a computer room, laundry facilities, trunk room, and other common spaces. Many of our common spaces have a piano and a grandfather clock. 

Apartments

In Residence Hall Apartments

  • 120 1837 (2 students)
  • 121 1837 (3 students
  • 102 Abbey (2 students)
  • 102 Brigham (3 students)
  • 123 Ham (4 students)
  • 102 MacGregor (3 students)
  • 204 Mead (2 students)
  • 101 North Rockefeller (3 students)
  • 101 South Rockefeller (3 students)
  • 115 Torrey (3 students)
  • 100 Wilder (2 students)

Students choose to live in one of the residence hall apartments must purchase the full board plan. The same amenities, including telephone, cable television, and the internet, as with traditional residential rooms are available for in residence hall apartment residents.

Non-Residence Hall Apartments

  • 1 Faculty Lane 
    • 1st Floor (2 students)
    • 2nd Floor (2 students)
  • 17 Morgan Street
    • 1st Floor (3 students)
    • 2nd floor (3 students)
    • 3rd floor (3 students)
  • 3 Park Street
    • 1st Floor (3 students)
    • 2nd Floor (2 students)
  • 57 College Street 
    • Back Apartment (3 students)
  • 92 College Street
  • 94 College Street
    • 2nd Floor (4 students)
    • 3rd Floor (2 students)

The housing options for Frances Perkins students reflect the philosophy that developing a campus life can be an important part of the undergraduate experience. Frances Perkins students who elect to reside on campus will be housed in 57 College Street or 3 Park Street. Frances Perkins scholars can opt in to living in a traditional residence hall. Students who live in one of these non-residence hall apartments have a choice of purchasing the full board plan or no board plan. For students who do not choose the full plan and are financial aid recipients, there may be a reduction in aid. Non-residence hall apartments do not have in building laundry. Students will have full access to all college internet and cable services. Only standard bedroom furniture is provided and students in those spaces must provide any additional furniture that is needed for common space. If furniture is left behind by other students, it is left for the next occupants to use. 57 College Street has designated rooms for commuting Frances Perkins students.

Standard Furnishings

Student rooms vary in size and shape varies across campus. Each room is furnished with standard twin size bed (36"x72"), bookcase, desk and desk chair, mirror, and dresser. Each room has a telephone and computer jacks; most rooms have one computer jack for each student and there is wireless coverage in all rooms.

Laundry

Each residence hall has basement laundry facilities with washers and dryers. The washers and dryers are on the One Card system. In order to use the washers and dryers you will need to open an MHC Xpress account with Auxiliary Services located at Central Services, 413-538-3111.

Quiet Floors

Several floors offer quiet living spaces. Residents of these communities agree to 24 hour quiet hours with additional silent hours to better facilitate quiet study and sleep. Quiet Floors are located on the 2nd, 3nd, & 4th floor of Brigham Hall and the 4th & 5th floors of 1837 Hall. 

Residence Hall Heating Systems

Check your residence hall for tips on how to make your residence hall heating system work for you.

Our Residence Halls

1837 Hall

1837 Hall

1837 Hall is located between Prospect Hall and the Mandelles, and is across Lower Lake from Pratt Hall and Ciruti Center for Foreign Languages.

1837 Hall Details

Built in 1962 on the base of Prospect Hill, overlooking Lower Lake, 1837 Hall was named after the year Mary Lyon founded Mount Holyoke Female Seminary. A footbridge above the lower lake waterfall connects 1837 to the southern end of campus.

Year Built: 1962
Year Renovated: 2005
# of Students: 155
# of Floors: 5
# of Singles: 54
# of Doubles: 48
# of Triples: 0
# of Quads: 0
# of Suites: 0
# of Apartments: 2
Ground Floor Rooms: Yes
# Sharing Bathroom: 24
Accessible: Yes
Elevator: Yes
Dumbwaiter: No
Kitchenette on Floors: 2,3,4,5
Full Kitchen: Yes
Floor Lounges: No
All Classes: Yes
Quiet Floors: 4,5

Abbey Hall

Abbey Hall

Abbey is one of two residence halls on the south side of Mary Woolley Hall and Chapin Auditorium (where many campus events are held), as well as Rooke Theater and Pratt Music Building. It is also near Gorse, the primary student parking lot on campus.

Abbey Hall Details

Built in 1939 with funds provided by Emily Abbey, who also gave money for the renovation of the chapel in 1937, Abbey Hall was designed by Douglas Orr, who also designed Buckland and Torrey. Abbey Hall houses 83 students in single, double, and triple configurations, on three floors. Abbey's third floor is designated as the Mary Wooolley floor (LGBTQIA+), where residents are committed to developing a safe, supportive and celebratory environment with particular regard to those complexities which pertain to the historical and contemporary experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, aromantic and allied people.  

Year Built: 1939
Year Renovated:
N/A
# of Students: 83
# of Floors: 3
# of Singles: 56
# of Doubles:
11
# of Triples: 1
# of Quads: 0
# of Suites: 0
# of Apartments:
1
Ground Floor Rooms: No
# Sharing Bathroom: 26
Accessible:
No
Elevator:
Yes
Dumbwaiter: No
Kitchenette: Each Floor
Full Kitchen: No
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes: Yes
Quiet Floor: No

Brigham Hall

Brigham Hall

Brigham is located next to Mary Lyon Hall and is close to academic buildings, Skinner green and Blanchard Campus Center. Brigham's floors 2, 3 and 4 are designated as quiet floors, which mean the residents there agree to a higher standard of quiet 24 hours a day.

Brigham Hall Details

Built in 1897, Brigham Hall - the first building to be completed after the Seminary fire - was named for Mary Brigham, a former Seminary teacher who was also a proponent of the cottage housing system and who raised $3,000 for the College toward the construction of cottages. Brigham was slated to become the President of the College in 1889, but was killed in a train accident shortly before she was to take office.  Brigham Hall was constructed with funds raised by the alumnae of New York and Brooklyn, and was the home of the College presidents from 1897 to 1909.

It is one of a trio of halls built in 1897 (Safford and Porter are the others). It houses 80 students in single, double and triple rooms on 4 floors and a basement. It faces the Gaylord Library opposite route 116.

Year Built: 1897
Year Renovated: N/A
# of Students: 80
# of Floors: 5
# of Singles: 38
# of Doubles: 16
# of Triples: 2
# of Suites: 0
# of Apts.: 1
Ground Floor Rooms: Yes
# Sharing bathroom: 19
Accessible: No
Elevator: No
Dumbwaiter: Yes
Kitchenette: 2, 3, 4
Full Kitchen: No
Floor Lounges: No
All Classes?: Yes
Quiet Floor: 2, 3, 4
Buckland Hall

Buckland Hall

Buckland is located near Mary Woolley Hall and Chapin Auditorium (where many campus events are held), as well as Rooke Theater and Pratt Music Building. It is also near Gorse, the main student parking lot on campus.

Buckland Hall Details

Built in 1956, Buckland is known for its modern architectural design. It was designed by Douglas Orr, who also designed Abbey and Torrey. Buckland was named for Buckland, Massachusetts, the hilltown birthplace of Mary Lyon, the founder of Mount Holyoke.

Buckland Hall houses 120 students in single, double, and triple rooms on four floors and a basement. Buckland has a large modern living room and spacious rooms. 

Year Built: 1956
Year Renovated: N/A
# of Students: 120
# of Floors: 5
# of Singles: 39
# of Doubles: 38
# of Triples: 1
# of Quads: 0
# of Suites: 0
# of Apartments: 1
Ground Floor Rooms: Yes
# Sharing Bathroom: 24
Accessible: Yes
Elevator: Yes
Dumbwaiter: No
Kitchenette: 2,3,4
Full Kitchen: No
Floor Lounges: No
All Classes? Yes
Quiet Floors: No

Creighton Hall

Creighton Hall

Built in 2008, Creighton Hall is the first newly built residence hall on campus in roughly 40 years. With lakeside views and suite style living, this residence hall offers a unique living experience for MHC students. 

Creighton Hall Details

Creighton Hall is considered two separate halls (North Creighton and South Creighton), although they form one large building. Each of the two halls share a common living room space, game room, computer lab, Golden Pear kitchen. Residents of Creighton Hall are housed in doubles, singles, and suite style rooms. Suites have many different variations including double roomed suites and single roomed suites. All suites have a common space that is only accessible to the residents living in the suite.

North Creighton:

Year Built: 2008
Year Renovated: N/A
# of Students: 63
# of Floors: 4
# of Singles: 21
# of Doubles: 13
# of Triples: 0
# of Quads: 0
# of Suites: 4
# of Apartments: 0
Ground Floor Rooms: No
Accessible:
Yes
Elevator: Yes
Dumbwaiter: No
Kitchenette: 1&3
Full Kitchen: Yes
Floor Lounges: Yes
All Classes? Yes
Quiet Floors: No

South Creighton:

Year Built: 2008
Year Renovated: N/A
# of Students: 112
# of Floors: 4
# of Singles: 44
# of Doubles: 14
# of Triples: 0
# of Quads: 0
# of Suites: 11
# of Apartments: 0
Ground Floor Rooms: Yes
Accessible:
Yes
Elevator: Yes (via North)
Dumbwaiter: No
Kitchenette: All Floors
Full Kitchen: Yes
Floor Lounges: Yes
All Classes? Yes
Quiet Floors: No

Dickinson Hall

Dickinson House

Dickinson House is located across Route 116 from the Chapin Auditorium where many campus events are held and is also across the street from the Jeanette Marks house, the LGBTQIA cultural space on campus.

Dickinson House Details

Dickinson House was built in 1916 as a faculty dormitory called Faculty House. It was renamed in 1931 in honor of Emma E. Dickinson, class of 1867. Dickinson House has served many purposes over the years, with more recent incarnations as the home of the Women's Studies Program, the Five College Women's Studies Research Center and the on campus home of the Frances Perkins Scholars. Dickinson is located across Route 116 on Faculty Lane.

Year Built: 1916
Year Renovated:
2001
# of students: 63
# of Floors: 3
# of Singles: 23
# of Doubles: 17
# of Triples: 2
# of Quads: 0
# of Suites: 0
# of Apts: 0
Ground Floor Rooms:
No
Sharing Bathroom:
11
Accessible:
Yes
Elevator:
No
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchennette: No
Full Kitchen:
Yes
All Classes?: Yes
Quiet Floor: No

Ham Hall

Ham Hall

Ham Hall is located near Kendall Sports and Dance Complex and the Equestrian Center, as well as many of the academic buildings. All rooms in Ham feature a view of Upper Lake.

Ham Hall Details

Ham Hall was named after Roswell Gray Ham, who succeeded Mary Woolley as President of the College, from 1937 to 1957. Ham was the first residence hall built along Upper Lake. Ham is directly on the jogging path around upper lake. Ham Hall underwent renovations in the spring of 2007, updating the furniture, paint, and lighting in the common areas.

Ham Hall houses 157 students in single, double and quad rooms on seven floors.

Year Built: 1965
Year Renovated:
2007
# of Students:
157
# of Floors:
7
# of Singles:
59
# of Doubles:
39
# of Triples:
0
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
1
Ground Floor Rooms:
Yes
# Sharing bathroom:
21
Accessible:
Yes
Elevator:
Yes
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette:2,3,3,5
Full Kitchen:
No
All Classes:
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No

MacGregor Hall

MacGregor Hall 

MacGregor is the closest residence hall on campus to the nationally renowned Equestrian Center and is also near Kendall Sports and Dance Complex. MacGregor is notable for its bay windows, window seats, and spacious rooms. MacGregor is the home of the First Year Experience living-learning community.

MacGregor Hall Details

MacGregor Hall is named after Ruth MacGregor, a member of the class of 1910 who died on her way to serve with the Red Cross in France during World War I.  Rooms facing Upper Lake have a beautiful view. MacGregor Hall underwent renovations in the summer of 1999 with updated furniture, paint, and lighting in the common areas.

MacGregor Hall houses 136 students in single, double and triple rooms on five floors. 

In the fall of 2015, MacGregor became the home to our newly expanded living learning community called First Year Focus.  The building will be exclusively populated by first year students except for the Community Advisors, and Senior Community Advisor that have been selected to assist the students in that community as they begin their college experience.

Year Built: 1967
Year Renovated: 
1999
# of Students: 
136
# of Floors: 
5
# of Singles:
 24
# of Doubles: 
48
# of Triples: 
4
# of Suites: 
0
# of Apts: 
2
Ground Floor Rooms: 
No
# Sharing bathroom: 
30
Accessible: 
Yes
Elevator: 
Yes
Dumbwaiter: 
No
Kitchenette:
Each Floor
Full Kitchen: 
No
Floor Lounges: 
No
All Classes? 
No
Quiet Floor: 
No


Mandelle Hall

Mandelle Hall

Mandelle Hall is located next to 1837 Hall and near Pratt Music Building. Residents of North and South Mandelle are housed in single, double, and triple rooms.

Mandelle Hall

North and South Mandelle Halls (often called the Mandelles or the 'Delles) were constructed in 1923. North and South Mandelle are separate, smaller halls that connect to form one large building. The Mandelles are at the south end of Prospect Hill. The building was originally called Hillside, but it was renamed in 1930 in honor of Mary B. Mandelle. The Mandelles are notable because they resemble the older halls that surround Skinner Green, but are set across Lower Lake.

North Mandelle houses 113 students on four floors and a basement and South Mandelle houses 90 students on four floors. The Mandelles also have three two-room doubles, the first of their kind on campus. The Mandelles feature beautiful living rooms and sun rooms. As of Fall 2017, the Mandelles will house our Language Living Learning Communities. 

North Mandelle first floor was renovated in the summer of 2005, adding several private rooms with bathrooms along with a game room and student kitchen to be shared by residents of both halls. Additionally, a major renovation of North Mandelle took place in 2012 and included updates to student rooms and bathrooms on the upper floors.  A similar renovation of South Mandelle took place in the summer of 2013.

North Mandelle

Year Built: 1923
Year Renovated:
2012
# of Students:
112
# of Floors:
5
# of Singles:
59
# of Doubles:
20
# of Triples:
3
# of 2 Room Doubles:
2
# of Apts:
0
Ground Floor Rooms:
Yes
# Sharing bathroom:
20
Accessible:
No
Elevator:
Yes (via South)
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette: 2, 3, 4
Full Kitchen:
Yes
Floor Lounges:
4th
All Classes
: Yes
Quiet Floor:
No

South Mandelle

Year Built: 1923
Year Renovated:
2013
# of Students:
69
# of Floors:
4
# of Singles:
48
# of Doubles:
8
# of Triples:
1
# of 2 Room Doubles:
1
# of Apts:
0
Ground Floor Rooms:
No
# Sharing bathroom:
28
Accessible:
Yes
Elevator:
Yes
Dumbwaiter:
No
Dining Hall:
No
Luncheon Center:
No
Kitchenette:
2, 3, 4
Full Kitchen:
Yes
Floor Lounges:
3rd
All Classes:
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No

Mead Hall

Mead Hall

Mead is located along Skinner Green in the center of campus. It is near Blanchard Community Center, Pratt Music Building, Skinner Hall and Chapin Auditorium.

Mead Hall Details

Mead Hall was built in 1901, and named for Elizabeth Mead, president of the College from 1890-1900. President Mead was responsible for major changes in the curriculum and structure that allowed Mount Holyoke to become one of the leading women's colleges in the United States. Brigham Hall, Safford Hall, Porter hall, the original Rockefeller Hall, Blanchard Student Center, and Pearsons Hall were all built during her tenure. 

Renovated in the summer of 2006, Mead Hall houses 144 students in single, double, and triple rooms and a 3 persion suite on four floors and a garden level. Mead is known for its attractive living spaces, including an updated TV/Game room, student kitchen, and dining cove.

Year Built: 1901
Year Renovated:
206
# of Students:
144
# of Floors:
5
# of Singles:
33
# of Doubles:
44
# of Triples:
6
# of Suites:
1
# of Apts:
1
Ground Floor Rooms:
Yes
# Sharing bathroom:
26
Accessible:
Yes
Elevator:
Yes
Dumbwaiter:
No
Dining Hall:
No
Kitchenette: 2, 3, 4
Full Kitchen:
Yes
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes:
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No

Pearsons Annex

Pearsons Annex

Pearsons Annex is located across the street from the Library and Dwight Computing Labs. It is between Pearsons Hall and the Village Commons, a very convenient location for students. Pearsons Annex residents share a full kitchen.

Pearsons Annex Details

Pearsons Annex was built before 1810 and had been known as the "Brick Store." The college purchased it and converted it into a freshman house, and gave it a name formerly given to the house next door. Pearsons Annex is the home of a small living-learning community created by students.  The goals and learning outcomes of this community are developed by the students in concert with Residential Life. 

Year Built: 1810
Year Renovated:
N/A
# of Students:
12
# of Floors:
2
# of Singles:
11
# of Doubles:
 1
# of Triples:
0
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
0
Ground Floor Rooms:
No
# Sharing Bathroom:
4
Accessible:
No
Elevator:
No
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette: No
Full Kitchen:
Yes
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes?
No
Quiet Floor:
No


Pearsons Hall

Pearsons Hall

Pearsons is located on Route 116 directly across the street from Mary Lyon Hall and Williston Memorial Library.

Pearsons Hall

Pearsons Hall was one of the first four buildings built in 1897 after the fire that destroyed the Seminary building. It was named for Dr. Pearsons, a physician in Chicopee and a Chicago real estate magnate, who admired Mary Lyon's work. He donated money and founded the endowment fund. 

Pearsons Hall houses 136 students on four floors in single, double, and triple rooms. Pearsons was renovated during the summer of 2000. Pearsons is notable for its beautiful common areas including multiple living rooms and a sun room.

Year Built: 1897
Year Renovated:
2000
# of Students:
136
# of Floors:
4
# of Singles:
35
# of Doubles:
46
# of Triples:
2
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
0
Ground Floor Rooms:
No
# Sharing Bathroom:
17
Accessible:
 First Floor Only
Elevator:
No
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette: Each Floor
Full Kitchen:
No
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes?
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No


Porter Hall

Porter Hall 

Porter Hall houses 97 students on four floors, in single, double, and triple rooms. Porter is known for its excellent location on campus, right next to Blanchard Community Center and most classrooms on campus, as well as very close to Williston Memorial Library. 

Porter Hall Details

Porter Hall is one of the first residence halls built after the fire that destroyed the seminary building in 1897, and one of a trio (Brigham, Safford, and Porter). Porter Hall was designed by C. Putnam Karr and named for Deacon Porter, a trustee of the college from 1836 to 1877. Porter was in charge of buildings on the Board of Trustees and was Mary Lyon's chief accounting advisor and her good friend. In 1987 Porter was renovated, and no longer houses students on the first floor of the building. The first floor is now the home of the Sociology and Anthropology Department. The rooms feature hardwood floors and vary in size like many of the other older residence halls.

Year Built: 1897
Year Renovated:
2010
# of Students:
97
# of Floors:
4
# of Singles:
24
# of Doubles:
24
# of Triples:
8
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
0
Ground Floor Rooms:
Yes
# Sharing Bathroom:
14
Accessible:
 First Floor Only
Elevator:
No
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette: 2nd Floor
Full Kitchen:
Yes
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes?
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No



Prospect Hall

Prospect Hall

Prospect Hall houses 144 students on five floors in single and double rooms.  Prospect is located next to Willits-Hallowell Center, the main conference building, as well as near Gettell Amphitheatre, the Art Building, and Ciruti Center for Foreign Languages.

Prospect Hall Details

Prospect Hall was built in 1959 and stands at the foot of Prospect Hill, for which it was named. Prospect Hall is located on the northern shore of Lower Lake.  Many of the rooms in Prospect feature a beautiful view of Lower Lake. .

Year Built: 1959
Year Renovated:
N/A
# of Students:
143
# of Floors:
5
# of Singles:
52
# of Doubles:
44
# of Triples:
0
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
1
Ground Floor Rooms:
No
# Sharing Bathroom:
27
Accessible:
Yes
Elevator:
Yes
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette: 1, 2, 3, 4
Full Kitchen:
No
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes?
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No


This is a photograph of the Rockefeller residence hall, where two of the three new living-learning communities are housed

Rockefeller Hall

North and South Rockefeller halls are adjacent to Skinner Hall, Mary E. Woolley Hall, which houses Chapin Auditorium and the New York Room as well as several administrative offices. Poetry readings, lectures, and receptions often occur in the New York Room, while many entertainment events are offered in Chapin Auditorium.

Rockefeller Hall Details

Built in 1924, Rockefeller Hall (North and South, also known as the Rockies) are considered separate halls, although they form one large Tudor-style building.  North and South Rockefeller are smaller halls of 93 and 89 students respectively, and have spacious living rooms, sitting rooms, and sun porches. Residents of the Rockies are housed in single, double, and triple rooms on five floors.

North Rockefeller 
Year Built: 1924
Year Renovated: N/A
# of Students: 93
# of Floors: 5
# of Singles: 36
# of Doubles: 15
# of Triples: 8
# of Suites: 0
# of Apts: 1
Ground Floor Rooms: Yes
# Sharing Bathroom: 25
Accessible: No
Elevator: Yes
Dumbwaiter: No
Kitchenette: 2, 3, 4
Full Kitchen: No
Floor Lounges: No
All Classes? Yes
Quiet Floor: No

South Rockefeller

Year Built: 1924
Year Renovated:
N/A
# of Students:
89
# of Floors:
5
# of Singles:
38
# of Doubles:
12
# of Triples:
8
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
1
Ground Floor Rooms:
Yes
# Sharing Bathroom:
25
Accessible:
No
Elevator:
Yes (via North)
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette:  2, 3, 4
Full Kitchen:
No
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes?
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No


Safford Hall

Safford Hall

Safford is located between the academic green and Skinner Green, the center of campus. It is close to most classrooms and Blanchard Community Center, as well as Williston Memorial Library. Safford is also the home to the Office of Residential Life, Health Education, Alcohol and Drug Awareness Program and the Ombudsperson.

Safford Hall

Safford Hall is the second oldest residence hall on campus, built in 1897. It is one of a trio of Brigham, Safford, and Porter Halls. It was named for Deacon Daniel Safford and his wife. Deacon Safford was a contributor to the college from 1836, when Mary Lyon presented her plans for Mount Holyoke Female Seminary to him in Boston. He was a trustee of the college from 1837-1856. Safford Hall was built in the style of the renaissance movement in England.

Safford Hall houses 70 students in single and double rooms on three floors. Safford is known for its small size and intimate atmosphere. It is known for its beautiful common areas and location on campus. 

Year Built: 1897
Year Renovated:
2008
# of Students:
70
# of Floors:
3
# of Singles:
22
# of Doubles:
24
# of Triples:
0
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
0
Ground Floor Rooms:
No
# Sharing Bathroom:
23
Accessible:
 First Floor Only
Elevator:
No
Dumbwaiter:
Yes
Kitchenette: 2, 3
Full Kitchen:
Yes
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes?
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No

Torrey Hall

Torrey Hall

Torrey Hall houses 122 students in single and double rooms on four floors and a mezzanine. Torrey is known for its spacious student rooms and common areas. It is located near Kendall Sports and Dance Complex, the Career Development Center, and the Patti Groves Health Center. 

Torrey Hall Details

Torrey Hall was built in 1949, and was originally called Lakeside. In 1956, it was renamed Torrey Hall, in honor of Louisa Torrey (class of 1845), who was the mother of William Howard Taft. Torrey was designed by Douglas Orr, who designed Abbey and Buckland Halls as well. The resemblance between Torrey Hall and Buckland Hall is apparent. 

Year Built: 1949
Year Renovated:
N/A
# of Students:
122
# of Floors:
5
# of Singles:
43
# of Doubles:
38
# of Triples:
0
# of Quads:
1
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
1
Ground Floor Rooms:
Yes
# Sharing Bathroom:
23
Accessible:
No
Elevator:
Yes
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette: Each Floor
Full Kitchen:
No
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes?
Yes
Quiet Floor:
No


Wilder Hall

Wilder Hall

Wilder is known for its location on campus and its beautiful architecture.  It is located on Skinner Green adjacent to Blanchard Community Center. It is near most classrooms, as well as Pratt Music Building and Lower Lake.

Wilder Hall Details

Wilder Hall was built in 1899, with a gift given by Charles Wilder of Wellesley Hills in memory of his wife Mary Ware Wilder, a member of the class of 1852. It was designed by G. Powell Karr of New York, in the style of the Elizabethan renaissance.

Wilder Hall houses 101 students in single, double, and triple rooms on four floors. Renovated in the summer of 2004, Wilder was the first residence hall to become fully accessible. With its central location, carpeted hallways, hardwood floors, and beautiful common rooms, Wilder is popular among students.  

Year Built: 1899
Year Renovated:
2004
# of Students:
101
# of Floors:
4
# of Singles:
22
# of Doubles:
37
# of Triples:
1
# of Suites:
0
# of Apts:
1
Ground Floor Rooms:
No
# Sharing Bathroom:
25
Accessible:
Yes
Elevator:
Yes
Dumbwaiter:
No
Kitchenette: 2, 3, 4
Full Kitchen:
Yes
Floor Lounges:
No
All Classes?
 Yes
Quiet Floor:
No